Building and Construction Courses

Frequently Asked Questions about Building and Construction

Who can study Building and Construction?

Many people who study a course in Building and Construction Management already have experience in the industry. Whether this is through working as an apprentice and working your way up, or working directly leadership and management positions. Our Building and Construction courses are perfect for those ready to go off the tools and start their career in this exciting industry.

What kind of career can I expect from a Building and Construction course?

A Building and Construction course can open many doors for you. Our online Building and Construction courses can set you up for both entry-level and senior management positions such as:

  • Construction Foreman
  • Contract Administrator
  • Site Supervisor
  • Construction Manager
  • Estimator
  • Construction Project Manager
  • Registered Builder
What skills will a Building and Construction course get me?

Building and Construction courses are designed to equip you with the skills crucial to succeed in the highly competitive but rewarding Construction Management industry. You will learn a range of soft and hard skills such as:

  • Worksite coordination and management
  • Stakeholder and resource management
  • WHS risk management
  • Understanding legal obligations and applicable codes and standards
  • Financial management
  • People management
How long does it take to study a Building and Construction course?

A Diploma course can take approximately 12 months to complete if studying full-time, Certificate IV courses can be as short as 10 months full-time, while you should expect around 18 months to complete an Advanced Diploma.

The duration of your qualification is also dependent on how many hours you put in each week to study, however at CAL all students are offered a generous 24-month enrolment period to complete their Construction Management qualifications at their own pace.

Can I study a Building and Construction course online?

Building and Construction Management courses are a perfect fit for online and self-paced study. By learning at your own pace, you’re not held back by the speed of the classroom and you have the freedom to pause and pick up your studies around your own schedule.

Whether you’re looking to upskill, change careers or kick start a new pathway, studying Building and Construction Management online is a smart choice to earn the practical skills you need to excel paired with the flexibility to study when and where it suits you.

What are the best Building and Construction courses to study in Australia?

The best Building and Construction courses to study are vocational qualifications. If you’re looking to get off the tools and start in management, a Certificate IV in Building and Construction (Site Management) (CPC40320) is the perfect starting point. Those already in management and looking to upskill will find that their best choice is the Diploma of Building and Construction (Management) (CPC50320).

Getting qualified with a Nationally Recognised course demonstrates a level of skill that employers can rely on, with the right combination of practical skills and interpersonal capabilities to move up the career ladder and apply your knowledge in a variety of roles and sectors relating to Building and Construction Management.

Do you need to study a Building and Construction course to become a Building Site Manager?

Getting a Site Manager role in the Building and Construction industry is a key first step in your career. Studying a Site Management course will give you the foundation skills you need to kickstart your career and apply practical skills like worksite coordination and effective liaison skills straight into your job. With a few years experience, the right set of hands-on skills and a recognised Building and Construction qualification, you can look to make the move into becoming a Construction Manager, or other managerial roles in the industry.

Do you need to study a Building and Construction course to become a Construction Project Manager?

Becoming a Construction Project Manager usually needs at least a Diploma-level qualification coupled with a few years’ experience to be taken seriously in the industry. A Building and Construction course will teach the relevant technical skills and know-how like project planning and delivery and WHS management, as well as the transferable people and business management skills essential for getting ahead in the building and construction industry. Industry experience is strongly recommended, with most professionals having two years of experience before undertaking a Construction Management Diploma.

Your future in Building and Construction

A building and construction career is a challenging, but deeply rewarding choice for those ready to upskill and step into a senior role, or take the reins and become a registered builder.

Becoming a building and construction management professional will see you working on a range of construction sites and handling many different managerial responsibilities like liaising with stakeholders and ensuring contracts and schedules are being met.

To succeed in a career in building and construction, you’ll need interpersonal skills such as strong communication and team leadership. Building and construction also suits those with strong problem-solving and project management skills. These skills will set you apart to employers, and see you succeed in your new role.

Building and construction qualifications can help you gain these valuable skills and more, and put you on the right career path. Find out more about the range of building and construction management courses available at the College for Adult Learning and get ready to start your new career.

Discover your future here

About Building and Construction

Trends for Building and Construction in Australia

Building and construction management is an ever-changing and developing industry, with innovation and technology being the main driving forces behind these changes. In fact, the construction and building industry is one of the most adaptable and resilient industries in Australia.  So, if you’re in the building and construction industry or planning to be, what job trends should you be watching out for? New technology in construction The opportunities for expansion within technology in the construction industry are vast and constantly being researched. Here are six emerging technologies to look out for: Drones: Enables you to see the job site from above, giving all those involved a better idea of what kind of work is required to create the best building design for the area. Connected job sites: Allows for better communication and understanding of the project, sharing measurements, instructions and plans between sites – available at any time. 3D printing: Brings a plan, photo or drawing to life by building tangible models that impart a better sense of a project. Artificial intelligence (AI): The uses of AI are incredibly broad with endless applications during the planning and building stages.  Wearable technology: Enables setting reminders and alarms, as well as being easily contactable on the go, without the worry of losing your phone onsite or carrying around a tablet or computer. Robotics: Becoming incredibly precise and accurate. Robotics can be used during the most repetitive tasks, freeing up people for more difficult cognitive tasks. Over the past few years, these technologies have all been growing and innovating to make working in construction easier, safer and more streamlined across sites and people. Therefore, it is important to keep up-to-date with emerging technologies and how they can work for you. Download our FREE 'Your Career in Building and Construction Management' Guide Find the latest information in our eBook about a career in construction management, including current job opportunities, skills you need, salary information and more. DOWNLOAD MY FREE GUIDE   How many women are in the construction industry? Currently, only 13% of the construction industry is made up of women workers. However, with recent government policy changes, the construction industry is no longer as male-dominated as it once was. Women from all walks of life enjoy the career opportunities that building and construction offer. In the last two decades, the number of women taking advantage of the high salaries and workplace flexibility on offer in trades has doubled. In coming years, expect to see more women in the construction workforce and an increasingly inclusive industry for all involved.  Sustainability trends in construction An increase in climate action sentiment in Australia is forcing companies to reconsider their practices in the workplace. Sustainability is especially important in building and construction due to the high potential of waste created in the process. Expect to see an increase in recycling schemes, a focus on reusing as much as possible and sustainably sourcing alternatives to common building materials.  Here are five straightforward practices to ensure you remain sustainable in the building and construction industry: Better waste management: Best practice is to segregate waste with clearly labelled and colour-coded bins, skips or bags, and implement a dedicated waste section on-site. This makes recycling materials correctly much easier.  Deconstructing: Demolition is a messy, polluting procedure that has far less long-term gain than precise deconstruction. Deconstruction allows for a safe environment and a high potential to reuse or sell recycled materials in the process. Renewable and efficient energy use: Propelling the industry forward in innovation and career opportunities, renewable energy in Australia continues to grow. Solar power will continue to be in demand as clients look to incorporate this into new or existing builds.  Source sustainable materials: Sourcing sustainable materials is a fantastic way to keep a construction site on ethical footing for only a slight increase in cost. Research and support businesses that are not causing deforestation and are reducing emissions.  Reusing materials: Proper research can help you to source and build sustainably. Consumers are leading the way, by demanding environmentally friendly buildings and sustainable building materials in their projects.  Job opportunities in building and construction Thanks to ever-changing and recent technology trends, there is an optimistic outlook on career progression in the building and construction industry as we move forward.  Building and construction management is an exciting and rewarding industry that will continue to flourish through the next decade. The need for construction supervisors, project managers and good communicators makes this industry a smart choice for the career-savvy professional looking to make a change.  What can you take from these job trends? Opportunity! Now is the perfect time to upskill your qualifications and take the next step towards a rewarding and challenging career in building and construction. An online Diploma of Project Management (Specialising in Construction) (BSB50820) is the best place to start, designed for those wanting to move into senior construction project management positions.  Once you’re there, a Diploma of Building & Construction (Management) (CPC50320) will set you up to pursue opportunities in managing multi-million-dollar construction projects or running your own successful trade business.   Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE

how to become a construction manager

How To Become a Construction Manager

Are you looking to break into a career in construction management? Becoming a construction manager is a lucrative career choice for those ready to take the next step in their career. With relevant experience and a formal qualification, a construction manager role could be the perfect choice for you.  Learn how to become a construction manager with this step-by-step guide. What is a construction manager? It is essential to first have an understanding of the role of a construction manager and the responsibilities that come with it. Construction managers work to manage the planning, budgeting, and job scheduling that goes into constructing a building or other construction project. What does a construction manager do? Construction managers must apply their expertise in construction-related areas. Your day-to-day may look different depending on the projects you are working on. Here are some tasks you may perform: Schedule, collaborate, and communicate to ensure projects run smoothly and efficiently Work closely with subcontractors on-site Manage risks of construction-related activities Provide strong leadership while making sound decisions on behalf of the project Check in with the teams you are responsible for to ensure they have everything they need to complete their jobs Keep the project running to schedule Meet with community leaders, shareholders and other management professionals to address concerns Ensure everyone has the tools they need Monitor the availability and status of materials and resources Understand the different responsibilities involved in construction management  How much does a construction manager make? A construction manager’s salary is one of the highest in the building and construction industry. One of the many reasons to upskill into a construction manager role is the lucrative salary increase. In Australia, the average salary range for a construction manager is $100,000–$194,000 a year.  Skills and requirements for a construction manager To become a successful construction manager, it is essential to understand the job’s requirements. Most places require that you have at least five years of experience in construction or a related field. You should be well-versed in safety procedures, risk assessment techniques, building codes, cost-estimating practices, and principles of design. Construction management requires a deep understanding of the construction process, including safety protocols, regulations, codes, blueprints, and plans. Having a good knowledge of the materials and equipment used in construction is necessary for the safe and efficient execution of projects, as well as familiarity with WHS.  As a construction manager, it’s important to have excellent communication, problem-solving, and interpersonal skills. Soft skills can be learned through courses, on-the-job training, and informal experience. These skills will help you deal with people tactfully and collaborate effectively with co-workers. Additionally, having good soft skills is essential to ensure you successfully complete your projects on time and within budget guidelines. Download our FREE 'Your Career in Building and Construction Management' Guide Find the latest information in our eBook about a career in construction management, including current job opportunities, skills you need, salary information and more. DOWNLOAD MY FREE GUIDE   Is construction management hard? Construction management requires dedication and work to build your skills and experience. However, with a diploma qualification, a few years of on-site experience and some patience, it’s very achievable. Stick to your goal and you can be working as a construction manager with the six figure salary to match. What qualifications do I need to become a construction manager? Most employers prefer that job candidates for construction manager positions possess a diploma in construction management, civil engineering, building science, or a related field. Diploma qualifications typically provide comprehensive education on the principles and methods of construction theory and practices, as well as hands-on experience with relevant tools and software programs. A construction management online course can propel your career forward. The Diploma of Building & Construction (Management) (CPC50320) will teach you the fundamental skills needed to excel as a construction manager. You’ll learn how to liaise with stakeholders, as well as develop your WHS and risk management capabilities.  The benefit of studying a construction management diploma online is that you can enjoy self-paced, flexible study while gaining a nationally recognised qualification. You can also continue to work and gain experience in construction management, building your hands-on skills while you develop expertise only learned through formal qualifications.  Does a construction manager need a licence? Construction managers don’t need a licence, however, most construction managers start by directly working on a construction site. Most will have a white card and some also have a builder’s licence depending on their previous experience.  Is construction manager a good job? The construction industry is constantly growing and withstanding economic and societal stresses, making it a strong industry to upskill into. According to National Industry Insights, it generates over $360 billion in revenue in Australia, accounting for 9% of our GDP. This makes it a secure career choice for those looking at their long-term goals. Additionally, with a 10.2% job growth by 2026, becoming a construction manager is a sensible choice for your long-term career. Small and medium-sized businesses make up the majority of businesses in the construction industry. This benefits those looking for contract administrator jobs, as many of these can be found in small construction businesses. With a Diploma of Building & Construction (Management) (CPC50320), you’ll be prepared to go straight into a construction management position, with the ability to learn a wide range of skills crucial to overseeing high-level construction projects.    Discover your career in construction management Explore courses designed to help you elevate your career! Prepare for a construction management career, with the ability to learn a wide range of skills crucial to overseeing high-level construction projects. View courses

work health safety in construction

Is a Career in Work Health and Safety in Construction Right For You?

Working in construction work health and safety is an exciting and rewarding career that has the potential to make a large difference in worksite safety. Whether you have previous construction experience or are new to the industry, there are steps you need to take to get started on this journey and equip yourself with the skills and knowledge that can help you reach your goals. Find out more about roles within work health and safety in construction, and how you can secure your new career in WHS. Why is Work Health Safety in construction so important? The importance of work health and safety on a construction site cannot be overemphasised.  According to SafeWork Australia, 12,600 workers’ compensation claims are accepted from the construction industry a year. In addition, 35 serious claims are made every day in construction.  A Work Health and Safety position is perfect for those already with construction experience. WHS professionals in construction need to have an understanding of not only the rules and regulations surrounding all workers and sites but also the complex needs and issues unique only to this industry.  What does a Work Health Safety officer in construction do? A WHS officer in construction’s responsibilities can include responding to workplace incidents, identifying (WHS) hazards and controlling the associated risks, and planning the implementation of a work health and safety management system (WHSMS).  In construction, you’ll have a large focus on developing and executing health and safety plans according to current legal guidelines. You’ll inspect equipment and machinery to observe possible unsafe conditions and monitor compliance with policies and laws by inspecting employees and operations.  As a WHS officer, you’ll often conduct training and presentations on health and safety matters and accident prevention. WHS is not just the practice of ensuring workplace safety but making sure everyone on site understands their responsibilities and regulations, to build a culture of safety in the workplace.  Skills needed for WHS professionals A successful career in work health and safety construction requires you to have a variety of technical, managerial, and interpersonal skills. To develop a professional skill set that will make you attractive to prospective employers, look into taking courses or vocational programs specific to this industry that can help boost your expertise. Having the right certification is essential for most entry-level positions, so make sure you are certified in all appropriate areas before applying. Common soft skills to succeed in work health & safety include:   Strong communication skills   The ability to communicate clearly and instruct workers is crucial, given WHS professionals must interact with members at all levels of an organisation and must be able to articulate and convey important information.   Critical thinking   Being able to critically think and continuously question what you can do to improve a workplace and the well-being of workers is paramount.   Close attention to detail   WHS professionals need to have close attention to detail. They have the responsibility of maintaining safety on site, and nothing can be overlooked. As part of your career in WHS in construction, it is also important to stay current on the latest technologies and practices. Make sure you have a working knowledge of various software solutions and technologies used by the construction industry, including platforms that help ensure adherence to safety standards in the workplace. Familiarise yourself with new technologies, equipment, materials, and processes that create efficiencies when it comes to workplace health & safety standards. Keep up with advancements and changes in best practices so that you can suggest innovative solutions for creating safer work environments. Download our FREE 'Your Career in Building and Construction Management' Guide Find the latest information in our eBook about a career in construction management, including current job opportunities, skills you need, salary information and more. DOWNLOAD MY FREE GUIDE Work Health & Safety Courses Obtaining qualifications and certifications relevant to the WHS construction industry is essential. Look for safety-related qualifications that will give you the necessary information about WSH standards, best practices, and regulations in the construction field. Combining your hands-on experience with a qualification is a way to set you apart from other candidates.  If you’re after the basic skillsets to start your career in work health and safety, the Certificate IV in Work Health & Safety (BSB41419) will provide you with a solid foundation of WHS practices. After completing the course, you’ll be prepared to lead and manage change to work health and safety procedures within a construction setting, while developing transferable skills which will support you in a safety officer role. For senior roles in WHS, a Diploma of Work Health & Safety (BSB51319) will afford you a more comprehensive understanding of WHS policies and regulations. This course is designed to give you key occupational health and safety skills and strengthen your ability to make informed decisions, preparing you to take on leading WHS roles within any organisation. Studying either a certificate or diploma in WHS online at the College for Adult Learning allows you the extra flexibility to continue working and gaining valuable experience as you complete your qualification. Upon graduating, you’ll be prepared to enter an entry-level or senior WHS position.  Work Health Safety salaries Construction Safety Officer salary A Construction Safety Officer manages risks and safety issues on a construction site. They ensure health and safety plans meet compliance and are current against regulations. This is a common ‘entry’ pathway into WHS for those with previous construction experience and a certificate qualification.  For a long-term career plan, a WHS officer position offers job security and a strong starting salary. The average Construction Safety Officer salary is $64,221 a year (Payscale), with the average job growth for all Workplace Health & Safety officers at 15.9% over the next 5 years.  Health & Safety Manager salary A Work Health and Safety Manager oversees an organisation’s health and safety compliance. Using risk assessment and management tools, they develop policies, plans, and strategies to promote a safe working environment.  This is a senior position, often for those with extensive experience in work health & safety, coupled with a diploma qualification. As the responsibilities increase, so does the salary. The average Health & Safety Manager’s salary is $117,168 a year (Payscale). A WHS role in construction is a challenging, but rewarding role. Start your new career on the right foot with an online qualification from the College for Adult Learning. Find out how you can begin your career in work health and safety.

online construction management resume

Why Study an Online Construction Management Course

Construction management courses teach you the fundamental and versatile skills needed to succeed in this industry and are paramount to securing a job. Studying a construction management online course can fast-track you into a rewarding career across a range of entry-level and senior management roles. Ready to pursue a rewarding career in construction management? With an online course, you can get the education you need without the traditional classroom commitment.  Why Study an Online Construction Management Course? The construction industry is a strong industry that is constantly growing and withstanding economic and societal stresses. According to National Industry Insights it generates over $360 billion in revenue in Australia, accounting for 9% of our Gross Domestic Product*. This makes it a strong career choice for those looking at their long-term goals within a strong industry.  Small and medium-sized businesses make up the majority of businesses in the construction industry. This benefits those looking for management jobs as many of these can be found in small construction businesses. Upskilling and furthering your career in construction management usually means a good salary increase. Roles such as contract administrator can earn $120,000 a year, and construction managers themselves can earn on average $175,000 a year (Seek). Along with strong industry growth, a career in construction management is a smart career choice.  *https://www.mordorintelligence.com/industry-reports/australia-construction-market#:~:text=The%20Australian%20construction%20industry%20generates,industry%20employed%20approximately%201%2C143%2C600%20people. Why Study Online? Unlike traditional study methods, online courses are incredibly flexible – with access to your coursework available 24/7. You can study at any time that is convenient for you, without the need to travel to on-site classes regularly. This makes it possible to balance studying with the demands of a full-time job or family commitments. With no fixed assignment deadlines and 24 months to finish your course, you can fit study around your life and not the other way around.  With online courses, you’re in control of the pace at which you learn. That means if you need to take more time on a certain topic or area, without sacrificing additional classes, then you can do so – a flexibility that isn’t possible in physical classes.  As such, this enables you to focus and concentrate to fully understand each area taught. By studying online, you’ll get the same credentials and qualifications as those who attend on-campus courses. This means you can fast-track your studies and graduate earlier than anticipated. It’s also worth noting that many courses available online feature an extensive network of mentors, learning advisors, and lecturers, meaning you have as much support as those attending physical classes. For anyone wanting to fast-track their career in construction management but lacking the availability to attend classes in person, online study represents a valuable opportunity to become educated from the comfort of your own home. The benefit of studying a construction management diploma online at the College for Adult Learning is that you can enjoy self-paced, flexible study while gaining a nationally recognised qualification. Gain hands-on experience while also developing expertise that only formal education can provide. Construction Management Qualifications Whether you’re ready to take your first step into construction management, or you’re after a senior-level position, the College for Adult Learning has the right online construction management course for every step of your career path.  Site Manager Courses Specialised site manager courses can fast-track you straight into a site management position. By completing the Certificate IV in Building and Construction (Site Management) (CPC40120) you’ll get key site management skills to confidently supervise small residential and commercial construction projects. With the know-how to ensure construction plans comply with building codes and regulations, paired with critical planning skills to meet construction site labour and facility requirements, you’ll be confident to manage sites and teams within a construction workplace.  Contract Administrator Courses Specialised contract administrator qualifications and training are crucial to understanding the complex needs of contracts within the construction industry. With a contract administrator course such as the Certificate IV in Building Project Support (Contract Administrator) (CPC40320), you’ll be ready to begin your career as a contract administrator. You’ll understand how to prepare and negotiate contracts as well as being able to process subcontractor claims and ensure all contractual obligations are met.  Building Estimator Courses Completing a building estimator course such as the Certificate IV in Building Project Support (Estimator) (CPC40320) will see you develop key estimating skills to confidently prepare and deliver estimates and cost plans for construction projects. With this online construction estimator online course, you’ll be able to step into estimator roles with the know-how to identify project needs, from labour and resources to materials and facility overheads, as well as researching and comparing quotes and contractor rates to produce a full project cost estimate.  Construction Manager Courses A construction management diploma is the best way to be prepared for a career in management in this exciting industry. Become a successful certified construction manager by undertaking the Diploma of Building & Construction (Management) (CPC50320). In a competitive but highly rewarding job market, top-level companies demand construction certifications from professionals to ensure their skills covering a wide range of areas are industry-relevant. This construction manager online diploma will prepare you to excel in your rewarding management career, with the ability to learn a wide range of skills crucial to overseeing high-level construction projects. Construction Project Manager Courses Take your project management career a step further with a valuable construction project management qualification like the Diploma of Project Management (Specialising in Construction) (BSB50820). Managing construction projects is a rewarding career step to take for any project professional due to the vast number of job opportunities. With the right construction project management diploma, you can pursue opportunities in managing multi-million-dollar construction projects, running your own successful trade business, and more.  Builder Licence Course While there is no one course that can guarantee a builder’s licence, in most states the prerequisite for obtaining your builder’s licence is the Certificate IV in Building & Construction (Building) (CPC40120).  After completing this construction course, you’ll be equipped with valuable knowledge to successfully kickstart a career in the construction industry and take the first step on the path to achieving a builders licence. Construction management is a smart choice for those ready to upskill and build on their existing experience in a growing industry. Find out how you can take the next step in your career in building and construction with an online construction management course at the College for Adult Learning. 

how to create a construction resume

How To Create An Effective Construction Management Resume

Starting a career in construction management is a lucrative career choice. Getting off the tools and increasing your salary are common drawcards to these positions. However, securing your new role will require a strong construction management resume behind you. Understanding what potential employers are looking for in a construction management professional and tailoring your experience to their needs will give you an edge. With the right tips and guidance, you can create the perfect resume that reflects your skills and experience in the construction industry. Construction manager job description If you’re feeling stuck on what to put in your construction management resume that will make you a top candidate, a great place to start is within the job description of the job you’re applying for. If a job description emphasizes critical thinking or multitasking skills, you should use the same words when describing your experiences on your resume. Ensure that each past job is described in terms of what it required rather than just duties and responsibilities. This makes it more relevant to employers during their first glance at your resume. Most construction managers are responsible for liaising with stakeholders, managing teams, and overseeing worksites, and this is commonly reflected in the job descriptions of construction manager job listings. Relevant experience One of the strongest tools you can use to make your construction manager resume stand out is to emphasise your experience that’s relevant to the open position. Each construction job requires different skills and abilities that you need to demonstrate. For example, if you’re applying for a role in construction management, be sure to list any applicable project completions, training classes completed, or special certifications in building codes or management. In construction management especially, an employer needs to see which types of projects you have worked on, the results they achieved, and any problem-solving techniques used during a project. A successful construction manager will not only be experienced in a variety of ongoing projects but also possess the skills needed to complete them efficiently and on schedule. Construction management qualifications At the top of your resume, you should include a brief summary of your qualifications that discuss your relevant experience, abilities, and education. This will provide employers with the most important information about you before delving into your work history. Make sure to tailor it for the job—highlight past experiences that showcase strong leadership skills, problem-solving abilities, or organisational talents—and back up these points with hard numbers or specific examples. A well-written summary of qualifications can instantly grab an employer’s attention as they are skimming through your resume. A Diploma of Building & Construction (Management) (CPC50320) will teach you the necessary skills and expertise to succeed in a construction management position, and give you a competitive edge in your resume and job applications. Employers are looking for professionals skilled with the ability and skills crucial to overseeing high-level construction projects. The benefit of studying at the College for Adult Learning is that you can obtain a nationally recognised qualification with online, self-paced learning. You can continue to build on your construction management experience while you earn your qualification, making you job-ready upon graduation. CAL is also proud to offer our exclusive Careers Hub to our students to help them through their studies and beyond to achieve real outcomes. Our Careers Hub offers a one-on-one call to receive personalised advice from our in-house expert Career Coach. It also provides a range of information, resources, and templates for your job search and succeeding in job interviews. Download our FREE 'Your Career in Building and Construction Management' Guide Find the latest information in our eBook about a career in construction management, including current job opportunities, skills you need, salary information and more. DOWNLOAD MY FREE GUIDE Requirements for a construction manager Along with relevant qualifications and experience, there are often other requirements for a construction manager. These requirements can differ depending on the tasks and responsibilities expected of the specific job. Common other requirements include construction induction training, more known as a ‘white card’, which will allow you to carry out construction work. This is a requirement set out by state governments, so be sure to check your state’s laws and codes for more information and how to apply. If you have also earned industry-specific certifications or awards, it’s important to list these achievements to show that you are dedicated to pursuing the highest standards in construction management. Skills for construction management Every great resume needs a ‘key skills summary’. For a construction manager resume, you want to highlight skills and traits you have or have demonstrated in your experience, or gained from formal education. Again, try to keep as relevant to the job posting that you are applying for as possible. Successful construction managers need a range of hands-on, interpersonal, and ‘soft’ skills. Many of these can be learned through formal education, but some are personal traits learned through hands-on work, too. Common skills for construction managers include: Numerical and analytical skills Procedural knowledge Writing and documentation management skills Problem-solving skills Ability to delegate effectively and efficiently Adaptable Maintain a professional format It may seem like a given, but you should still ensure your formatting and design are professional. Pick fonts that are easy to read, such as Arial or Times New Roman, and keep the font size between 10 and 12 points. Use concise headers and bold text for emphasis. Place special attention on contact information and any relevant educational accomplishments. Make sure hiring managers don’t skim over your resume by ensuring it is easy to read and well-polished. You may be the best person for the job, but they will never know if your resume doesn’t stand out or is just too cluttered and disorganised. Your career in construction management starts with a standout resume. Use our tips to help you craft the right resume in order to stand out from other applicants and get noticed by employers. If a construction manager role is right for you, gain relevant industry skills and expertise with a Diploma of Building & Construction (Management) (CPC50320). Enjoy self-paced, online study to gain a diploma while you work. Upon graduating, you’ll have the skills and experience employers are looking for. Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE  

How To Become A Site Manager

Site managers play a critical role in construction businesses and organisations. This can be overseeing technical projects, all the way to managing teams within a building and construction site. Whether you’re a seasoned professional looking to transition into the role, or an aspiring first-time manager, becoming a site manager could be the right choice for you. Pursuing a career as a site manager requires a combination of knowledge, skills, and expertise that can be acquired through both qualifications and relevant experience. Here, we’ll break down how to become a successful site manager and all the steps needed to start. What does a site manager do? Site managers must be able to manage multiple aspects of running a construction site, such as: Overseeing operations and staff Managing budgets and schedules Approving projects Resolving conflicts and disputes Planning and coordinating events Supervising safety regulations A successful site manager will be expected to understand the fundamentals of each project they work on – such as its scope, specifications, best practices, and safety regulations. While the exact skills you’ll need may differ depending on your industry, the basics remain the same. Mastering the following topics will serve as a good training ground: Labour management and motivation Materials handling Storage methods Scheduling and budgeting tactics Problem-solving methods Risk assessments Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE How much does a site manager earn? A site manager position is a rewarding choice for those ready to get off the tools and remain on work sites. It also comes with a generous salary. In Australia, the annual salary for a site manager is typically between $130,000 and $205,000 depending on the industry and level of experience. In addition, the expected job growth for this role over the next five years is 10.2%, making it an attractive long-term choice for those looking for a steady career. With the Australian Government committing $225 billion to construction, building, and infrastructure in the 2022/23 financial year, the need for skilled professionals in this industry will only continue to grow. Site manager courses Whether you’re just starting or transitioning from another career, it’s important to get a qualification in site management. Higher education and professional certifications will give you the skills you need to understand the fundamentals of site management. You’ll learn how to deliver projects on time and budget and work effectively with clients and stakeholders. For an entry-level site supervisor role, a Certificate IV in Building & Construction (Site Management) (CPC40120) will see you gain the necessary skills and expertise to move into your first building and construction managerial role. For those with existing extensive experience in building and construction management, a Diploma of Building & Construction (Management) (CPC50320) is the perfect choice to grow your career and go into a senior position, such as a site manager. The benefit of studying a site management qualification at the College for Adult Learning is the ability to enjoy self-paced, flexible study. You can maintain your career and continue to build your construction experience while also gaining a nationally recognised qualification. Once qualified, you’ll have both the knowledge and hands-on experience to go straight into a site management role. Download our FREE 'Your Career in Building and Construction Management' Guide Find the latest information in our eBook about a career in construction management, including current job opportunities, skills you need, salary information and more. DOWNLOAD MY FREE GUIDE Site manager vs. site supervisor While both roles are similar, a site manager is responsible for overseeing and directing a variety of projects from beginning to end. Site supervisors are usually only responsible for their set site or area, ensuring the daily operations of their worksites run smoothly. A site supervisor is an entry-level construction management role, whereas a site manager may have more experience or a higher qualification behind them to handle the broader responsibilities of their role. A site manager may also handle multiple sites at once, while site supervisors generally are focused on one site. On large-scale projects, a site supervisor can often report directly to a site manager. Skills site managers need To be an effective site manager, you’ll need to master a variety of skills, tools, and techniques. These include understanding the basics of project management, such as: Create plans and budgets Use scheduling software Coordinate teams Report progress Handle risk management Use technology such as software programs to manage communication between staff, customers, and other stakeholders To be capable of utilising project management software and programs, it’s important to become comfortable with them. Knowing how to use the programs can go a long way in making sure your projects run on time and within budget. Furthermore, having a complete understanding of the practical applications of tools such as Gantt charts will give you an edge when managing large-scale projects. To work as a successful site manager, it’s important to develop and hone your interpersonal skills. As management is an essential part of any project, you should strive to be comfortable in both one-on-one and team settings. Good communication, problem-solving capabilities, empathy, delegation, leadership, and an efficient way of working are all desirable traits for a great manager. Whether you’re ready to get your foot in the door in a building and construction management role, or you’re prepared to utilise your skills and experience in a higher-level role, upskilling with CAL can assist you in finding your new career path. Remain close to the action while enjoying a higher salary with a site management or site supervisor position. Take the next step in your building and construction career with a qualification at the College for Adult Learning. Studying the Diploma of Building & Construction (Management) (CPC50320) can prepare you for a construction management role with the skills and expertise needed to be a successful site manager. Discover the perfect course for you Explore the College for Adult Learning's range of courses, across a variety of industries and qualification levels – from certificate IVs to double diplomas, construction management to human resources and leadership. Discover the course that will help you change careers, upskill, get qualified, promote yourself or find your passion.  EXPLORE COURSES

entry level construction management jobs

Entry-Level Construction Management Jobs

If you’re already working in construction, but are ready to go into a management position, you might be wondering what the next step is for you. There are many entry-level management positions in construction management, that allow you to put the tools down, but still utilise the skills and expertise you may have developed over years of experience in the construction field. With an expected 1,263,900 jobs in the construction industry in Australia by 2025*, there is no better time than now to consider your options and upskill for your dream job. Some of the most valuable entry-level construction management jobs are contract administrator, building estimator, project coordinator, and site manager. Find out which pathway is right for you. *https://nationalindustryinsights.aisc.net.au/industries/construction Entry-Level Career Pathways in Construction The construction industry is a strong industry – in that it will always be growing and withstanding economic and societal stresses. In Australia, it generates over $360 billion in revenue, accounting for 9% of our Gross Domestic Product. This makes it a strong career choice for those looking at their long-term goals. Labour Market Insights released new data relating to employment in the construction industry, solidifying it as a strong career choice. The data from LMI revealed that: Construction grew by 11.4% in the past year. The industry as a whole is expected to grow by 5.8% over the next five years Construction managers were the third-largest hiring occupations in the industry Average earnings in construction were higher than all the industry averages, with the average wage in construction at $1,305 a week *https://labourmarketinsights.gov.au/industries/industry-details?industryCode=E Each of the following entry-level managerial positions can lead you to more senior positions by giving you a taste of what ‘tools down’ work can look like. Contract Administrator A contract administrator oversees the planning, negotiation, and delivery of contracts on construction projects. They are responsible for ensuring that contracts are properly drafted and executed by both parties. Contract administrators liaise with both clients and subcontractors to ensure that contracts are understood by all parties, overseeing the completion of these contracts, and dealing with any and all issues that can arise regarding the contract. This is a great entry-level construction option for those wishing to take a step back from the hands on work and still remain a valuable asset. There are a handful of interpersonal, professional, and ‘hands-on’ skills required to be a contract administrator. To become a successful contract administrator, you must have excellent communication skills, strong organisational skills, and a good understanding of how contracts work. Upon completion of the Certificate IV in Building Project Support (Contract Administration) (CPC40320), you will have the necessary skills to work as a contract administrator, with an average salary across this role of $115,000. According to Seek*, contract administrators have an expected 8.8% growth in the next 5 years, giving it an added level of job security. *https://www.seek.com.au/career-advice/role/contracts-administrator Building Estimator Building estimators provide estimates and costs for construction projects. They are responsible for planning and proposing the budget of plans and projects on building worksites, and work closely with managers and contractors to manage quotes and estimates. Building estimators work on a range of construction sites, from residential to commercial, and even government projects. It is a mix of working independently, to working with many stakeholders and managers. This is why building and construction knowledge, along with soft skills such as great communication and interpersonal skills are necessary to succeed in this career. The skills and responsibilities that come with this position also come with a competitive pay rate. Upon completion of the Certificate IV in Building Project Support (Estimator) (CPC40320), you will have the necessary skills to be a great building estimator, with an average salary of $90,000. Seek expects an 8.6% job growth over the next 5 years. This makes it ideal for those looking at their long-term career options. Download our FREE 'Your Career in Building and Construction Management' Guide Find the latest information in our eBook about a career in construction management, including current job opportunities, skills you need, salary information and more. DOWNLOAD MY FREE GUIDE Site Manager Site managers oversee and manage the building project’s site requirements from start to finish. They may delegate tasks, coordinate the build, develop and execute project plans, advise on regulatory issues and uphold the work, health, and safety of the site. While site managers aren’t on the tools themselves, they are working on the sites they manage. This career path suits those that really want to stay close to the action, but are ready to work in a more senior managerial role. Site managers need good project management and stakeholder management skills, as well as the ability to resolve problems efficiently on-site and within teams. Pairing construction experience with the Certificate IV in Building & Construction (Site Management) (CPC40120) is the perfect way to build a solid foundation of skills and get your career started on the right foot. Upon completion, you’ll be able to work confidently as a site manager, with an average salary of $130,000*. *https://www.seek.com.au/career-advice/role/site-manager/salary Foreman and Leading Hands Both foreman and leading hands are roles that lead into site management. These are the very entry-level construction positions into site management. This can be useful if you’re not quite ready to jump into a management position. Whilst you’re studying your certificate, entering into either one of these positions can allow you to get a feel for the responsibilities and skills needed for site managers. Project Coordinator Project coordinators coordinate all aspects of a construction project, from scheduling, budgeting, and hiring subcontractors. They also ensure that everything goes smoothly for the workers on the site. Sometimes, they can work as a bridge between the project manager and the team. They can also be more focused on the administrational duties of a project. Project coordinators in construction are the ones who ensure that everyone on site knows what they’re doing. They make sure everyone on site has the skills and tools needed to complete their job. This requires a high level of communication and interpersonal skills, as well as experience and knowledge of the construction industry. After completing the Certificate IV in Project Management Practice (BSB40920), project coordinators can enjoy a salary of up to $85,000. Those in this field can also expect job growth of 8.8% over the next five years. Construction project coordinator v Construction project manager Project managers oversee the entire project, while project coordinators work underneath the manager. Project coordinators carry out the duties directed to them by project managers. Becoming a construction project coordinator is the stepping stone into construction project management. The skills needed for project management can be learned through a diploma qualification, as well as the experience they gain through project coordination experience. Many find project coordination gives them enough of both the hands-on of working on a construction site and managerial responsibilities. Your career in construction doesn’t have to be primarily ‘on the tools.’ These entry-level jobs in construction management make the perfect pathway into more senior management positions. Find out more about pathways in your construction management career here, or enquire now to learn more about our construction management qualifications.

contract administrator v project coordinator

Contract Administrator vs Project Manager Career Paths

The construction industry is filled with job and growth opportunities for a range of careers and roles. With an expected growth of 5.8% and 1,388,500 construction jobs in Australia by 2026, becoming a contract administrator or project manager will set you up to be in two of the most highly sought-after construction jobs now and in the coming years. If you’ve worked on a construction site before, you’ve probably come across both a contract administrator and a project manager. Both these jobs follow different career paths, but both offer long-term success for those ready to ‘get off the tools’ while remaining in construction. What does a contract administrator do? A contract administrator oversees the planning, negotiation and delivery of contracts on construction projects. They are responsible for ensuring that contracts are properly drafted and executed by both parties. Contract administrators also negotiate contracts with project managers and stakeholders, ensure the obligations within it have been met, and often oversee the delivery of goods and services relating to the contract. Contract administrators can travel too – they may travel out to each site to negotiate with subcontractors, oversee worksites to ensure they are meeting contract obligations, and work with a team right up until project completion. Skills required for contract administration There are a handful of interpersonal, professional, and ‘hands-on’ skills that are required to be a contract administrator. Some of these will come from your own experience, and many can be learned through a formal contract administration qualification. The top skills required for a successful career in contract administration are: Strong knowledge of the construction industry Literacy skills Financial understanding of construction costs Understanding of legal codes relating to construction workplaces Communication and interpersonal skills Problem-solving Stakeholder management Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE How to become a contract administrator If contract administration sounds like the right pathway for you, there are options available to ensure you set yourself up for success. Contract administrators need a good understanding of how construction sites work, which is why many of them already work in construction. Along with construction experience, a formal qualification such as CAL’s Certificate IV in Building Project Support (Contract Administrator) (CPC40320) will equip you with the skills you need to succeed in this career path. In this certificate IV, you will learn how to: Identify, analyse and prepare construction contracts and plans Apply building codes and standards to the construction process Arrange building applications and approvals This course is completely online and self-paced, making it perfect for those already working and allowing you to work and gain further experience while you study. With both experience and a formal qualification, a contract administrator can expect to have a salary of $120,000 a year. This role is also projected to grow by 8.8% over the next five years, making it a ‘safe’ long-term option. What does a project manager do? As a project manager, you will coordinate the work of various tradespeople on a building project. You will also communicate with them and keep them informed of progress. A project manager must keep records of everything that happens during the project. This includes who did what, when, how much was spent, and any other details that track and pertain to the project. Communication between the project manager, teams and stakeholders is essential to ensure that everyone knows what needs to happen next. If there are any issues, they need to be resolved as soon as possible so that the project can continue smoothly. Download our FREE 'Your Career in Building and Construction Management' Guide Find the latest information in our eBook about a career in construction management, including current job opportunities, skills you need, salary information and more. DOWNLOAD MY FREE GUIDE Skills required for project managers Many skills that make up a great project manager are picked up from experience in the construction industry and from a formal qualification. The top skills required for a successful career as a project coordinator are: Sound knowledge of the construction industry Strong leadership ability Understanding of IT and construction software Time management skills Planning and organisational skills Problem-solving Soft skills such as great communication and interpersonal skills are vital for project managers, as liaising with team members and stakeholders is a significant part of this job. Communicating effectively to get a project completed to standard and on time are skills within leaders that will allow them to manage well and succeed in project management. How to become a project manager If project management is the right choice for you, you can take the steps now to set yourself up for a rewarding career. Most construction project managers already work in the construction industry, as they need a good amount of knowledge on how construction sites work and need to be managed. Along with experience, CAL’s Certificate IV in Project Management Practice (BSB40920) will afford you the right skills to see you become a successful project coordinator in the construction industry. Through the certificate IV, you will learn how to: Apply project management techniques to ensure projects are finished on time and within budget Manage project human resources to ensure you have the best people for the project Oversee stakeholder engagement to ensure all parties are aware of project requirements and key information CAL’s qualifications are completely online and self-paced, allowing you to work and maintain your job and on-site experience whilst also gaining your qualification. With this qualification and relevant industry experience, project managers in construction can earn a salary of $136,000 a year. The job growth for this role is at an expected 8.8% over the next five years. This makes it a great option for those wanting to find a long-term career. Pathways in the construction industry There are many pathways to ‘off the tools’ jobs in the construction industry that still allow you to work closely to the action. These two career paths are strong choices for those looking for a change while remaining in a growing industry. The construction industry is strong in that it will always be growing and withstanding economic stresses. In Australia, it generates $156 billion in reported gross value added and accounts for 9.6% of our workforce. This makes it a secure career choice for those looking for long-term options. CAL offers pathways into both these construction career options, with the Certificate IV in Project Management Practice (BSB40920) and Certificate IV in Building Project Support (Contract Administrator) (CPC40320). Both will give you the fundamental skills for a thriving career. Discover the perfect course for you Explore the College for Adult Learning's range of courses, across a variety of industries and qualification levels – from certificate IVs to double diplomas, construction management to human resources and leadership. Discover the course that will help you change careers, upskill, get qualified, promote yourself or find your passion.  EXPLORE COURSES

contract administrator vs building estimator - which is right for me?

Contract Administrator vs Building Estimator Career Guide

  Contract administrators and building estimators are important in any construction work site. While both are in demand, they play different roles in managing and overseeing a construction project. Figuring out what role is best for you might seem like a difficult task, but by understanding what each job requires, the benefits of each, and matching up which skills suit you best, you can discover which construction pathway is right for you. What is a contract administrator? A contract administrator manages and handles contracts within a construction site. They understand contracts, their legal requirements and how to draft them for construction projects. Contract administrators also: Negotiate with project managers and stakeholders Oversee the duration of the contract Ensure obligations within the contract are met Oversee the delivery of goods and services relating to the contract Contract administrators can travel, too! If they are working with subcontractors, they may travel to each site to negotiate, oversee sites to ensure they meet contract obligations and work with a team until project completion. What skills do I need for contract administration? To be a contract administrator, you need various interpersonal, professional, and hands-on skills. Some of these will come from your experience, but many can be learned through a formal qualification. The top skills required for a successful career in contract administration are: Knowledge of the construction industry Financial understanding of construction costs Understanding of legal codes relating to construction workplaces Communication and interpersonal skills Problem-solving Stakeholder management Download our FREE 'Your Career in Building and Construction Management' Guide Find the latest information in our eBook about a career in construction management, including current job opportunities, skills you need, salary information and more. DOWNLOAD MY FREE GUIDE   How do I become a contract administrator? Contract administration might be the right path for you if you’re working in construction and ready to progress in your career. CAL’s Certificate IV in Building Project Support (Contract Administrator) (CPC40320) will teach you the pragmatic and fundamental skills you need to further your career in a contract administration role. When studying with CAL, you’ll enjoy the benefits of flexible online learning, allowing you to develop your hands-on skills and gain your formal qualification at your own pace. Upon completing this course, you’ll have the necessary skills to work as a contract administrator with an average salary of $124,000. This role also has an expected job growth of 9.3% in the next five years, making it adverse to job uncertainty and offering plenty of opportunities for the long term. What is a building estimator? A building estimator estimates costs regarding building and construction plans and projects. Their job is to plan the costs of a building project, and in many cases, ensure those costs are met throughout the project duration. To do this, the building estimator will: Assess and review plans Visit potential construction sites Liaise with subcontractors Give an estimate The job of a building estimator doesn’t always end there. When budgets are finalised, construction managers may change the plans for a project, leaving a building estimator to start the process all over again. Building estimators work on a range of construction sites, from residential and commercial to government projects. It is a mix of working independently and with many stakeholders and managers. What skills do I need for building estimation? There are many skills you need to be a great building estimator. Some of these may be skills you already possess through your experience in the building industry and some may be skills you can learn through formal education. The skills required for a successful career as a building estimator are: Budget management Building and construction knowledge Mathematical literacy Understanding of work health and safety and the ability to uphold them Strong communication and leadership skills Knowledge of specific building regulations Time management and ability to work under pressure Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE   How do I become a building estimator? The building estimator pathway is perfect if you enjoy working in a construction job with people and budgets and enjoy making plans happen. Along with your construction experience, the next step to becoming a building estimator is to complete your formal qualification. CAL’s Certificate IV in Building Project Support (Estimator) (CPC40320) will afford you the skills you need to excel in a career as a building estimator. The convenience of flexible, online learning is that it allows you the chance to work on-site and gain experience as you work at your own pace to secure this qualification. Upon completing this estimating course, you will have the necessary skills to be a great building estimator with an average salary of $85,000 and an expected job growth of 11.9% over the next five years. This makes it a relatively safe career choice for long-term success. Career pathways in the construction industry The construction industry is constantly growing and withstanding economic stresses. The National Industry Insights Australia states that the industry generates over $360 billion in revenue, accounting for 9% of our GDP. This makes it a strong career choice for those looking for long-term options. There are also plenty of chances for growth in the building and construction industry with many pathways available. While you might be working in an entry-level construction job right now, after completing your certificate, you will be qualified to handle either contract administration or estimator responsibilities. There are also managerial positions within building and construction that can allow you to grow even further. Both contract administrators and building estimators are highly sought-after and respected positions in the construction industry. Whichever you feel meets your needs and skills, you can be confident that the construction industry is full of possibilities. You can find out more about both the Certificate IV in Building Project Support (Contract Administrator) (CPC40320) and Certificate IV in Building Project Support (Estimator) (CPC40320) courses or learn more about the current construction qualifications available to you at the College of Adult Learning.   Discover your career in building and construction Explore courses designed to help you take your career to the next level! If you’re ready to expand your career, building estimator and contract administrator courses can help make that happen. View courses

how to become a contract administrator

How To Become A Contract Administrator

If you currently work in the construction industry, you may already be familiar with contract administrators. A contract administrator oversees the planning, negotiation, and delivery of contracts on construction projects. They are responsible for ensuring that contracts are properly drafted and executed by all parties. Contract administration is a smart career option for those already in the construction industry. It requires a certain range of skills and experiences, but is it right for you? Read on to find out what a contract administrator really does, what salary you can expect, and how you can become a contract administrator. What is a contract administrator? A contract administrator is responsible for managing and handling contracts within a construction site. They must know everything about contracts – how to create one, ensure they meet codes of practice and legal obligations, and oversee a contract to completion on a construction project. As a contract administrator, you will need to make sure that all parties involved in the contract understand their obligations, as well as make sure they are following the rules and regulations set forth in the contract. You will also need to ensure that any changes made to the contract are communicated to all parties involved. Contract administrators can travel too. If working with subcontractors they may travel out to each site to negotiate, oversee sites to ensure that they are meeting contract obligations, and work with a team right up until project completion. Every day in a contract administrator’s life can be different. This can make it a challenging but worthwhile job prospect in construction. A typical day for a contract administrator may look like this: Liaise with stakeholders and ensure they understand the terms of their contract Visit a worksite to check in on the progress of a job per the contract schedule Finalise all that needs to be done to finish a contract Research and assess subcontractors. Skills required for contract administration A handful of interpersonal, professional, and ‘hands-on’ skills are required to be a contract administrator. Some of these will come from your own experience, and many can be learned through a formal qualification. To become a successful contract administrator, you must have excellent communication skills, strong organisational skills, and a good understanding of how contracts work. You also need strong literacy skills, both written and verbal. In this role, there is a lot of reading and communicating. Having a good understanding of both the written and spoken word is essential. As well as this, they need to have a good understanding of legal requirements, codes, and work health and safety practices. Ensuring contracts meet these is crucial, which is why contract administrators must be up to date with the legislation. Liaising with stakeholders, management, and workers is an everyday responsibility in this role. Due to this, communication and interpersonal skills are very important. Contract administrators also need a certain level of technological skills. Knowledge of how to use computer systems to manage contracts and projects will be advantageous. How to become a contract administrator Becoming a contract administrator is a great choice if you’re already working in the construction industry and are ready to grow your career further. If you believe you have the right skillset to be a successful contract administrator, here’s how you can now become one. Along with the hands-on and real-life experience in the construction industry, to start a career in contract administration you need a Certificate IV in Building Project Support (Contract Administrator) (CPC40320). This contract admin certificate will teach you the fundamental skills you need to become a contract administrator, including how to understand legal issues relating to contracts, how to read and interpret plans from a construction site, and preparing and administering contracts. When studying this certificate with CAL, you get the benefit of flexible online learning, allowing you to work and develop your hands-on skills, while also gaining your formal qualification. Contract administration salary Upon completion of the Certificate IV in Building Project Support (Contract Administrator) (CPC40320), you will have the necessary skills to work as a contract administrator, with an average salary across this role of $115,000. According to Seek*, contract administrators have an expected 8.8% growth in the next 5 years. This makes it an incredibly lucrative opportunity. Jobs will always be available in this field, and a certain level of job security, too. Through both your own hands-on experience and a qualification, you will have the sought-after skills to secure a position as a contract administrator. With this, comes a competitive pay rate, and the opportunity to go on to progress your career further. *https://www.seek.com.au/career-advice/role/contracts-administrator Career pathways in the construction industry The construction industry is a strong industry constantly growing and withstanding economic and societal stresses. According to National Industry Insights, in Australia it generates over $360 billion in revenue, accounting for 9% of our Gross Domestic Product*. This makes it a strong career choice for those looking at their long-term goals. Small and medium-sized businesses make up the majority of businesses in the construction industry. This benefits those looking for contract administrator jobs as many of these can be found in small construction businesses. Government positions are also a common pathway within this role. This work can include working for councils and being assigned multiple contracts, all at varying stages. *https://nationalindustryinsights.aisc.net.au/industries/construction Contract administrators are a key component to the effective planning and implementation of construction projects, and are a smart/strong/future-proof career path for those ready to get off the tools while still utilising their skills and experience. With a competitive salary, opportunities for growth, and flexibility, becoming a contract administrator may be right for you. If you’re ready to grow your career and become a contract administrator, the Certificate IV in Building Project Support (Contract Administrator) (CPC40320) is the perfect qualification to earn the skills you need. Enquire today to discover more. Download our FREE 'Your Career in Building and Construction Management' Guide Find the latest information in our eBook about a career in construction management, including current job opportunities, skills you need, salary information and more. DOWNLOAD MY FREE GUIDE

how to become a building estimator

How To Become A Building Estimator

A building estimator provide estimates and costs for construction projects. They are responsible for planning and proposing the budget of plans and projects on building worksites and work closely with managers and contractors to manage quotes and estimates. If you are already familiar with construction, you probably have heard about or worked with building estimators before. In this article, you can find out if becoming a building estimator is the right career path for you. What is a building estimator? A building estimator is responsible for the estimation of costs regarding building and construction plans and projects. Their job is to find out the cost of a building project, and in some cases, then make sure those costs are met and projects stay on target. To do this, the building estimator first assesses and reviews plans, ensuring they meet financial and legal requirements, potentially visiting the construction site, liaising with subcontractors, then finally, giving an estimate. The job of a building estimator doesn’t always end there. When budgets are finalised, managers may change the plans for a project, leaving them to have to start the process all over again. Building estimators work on a range of construction sites, from residential to commercial, and even government projects. It is a mix of working independently, to working with many stakeholders and managers. Although they can be responsible for a myriad of things, a typical day for a building estimator can look like this: Gathering proposals, plans, and blueprints to scope a range of estimate ideas Visit worksites to inspect and gather an understanding of costs Compile documents to prepare and calculate a proposal for a client They may also work on a few different projects at once, especially if they’re working in a government position. They can also be contracted or ‘hired out’ – it simply depends on what position suits you best. This offers a level of flexibility to the role. Following this, there can also be travel in the day-to-day work. Whether this is visiting construction sites for estimation purposes, visiting subcontractors to get accurate quotes, or meeting with clients to look over budgets. Skills required for a building estimator As outlined, a building and construction estimator has a lot of key responsibilities, and a precise set of skills to go along with them. Some of these are acquired with hands-on learning and experience, and other skills can be learned through a formal qualification. Building and construction knowledge is the first vital skill of a successful building estimator. You’ll need to be able to interpret plans and prepare preliminary sketches, understand legal codes of practice, and WH&S requirements. A good deal of mathematical literacy is important, as are strong budgeting skills. Some technical skills are also necessary, as you will be using computers and software to complete your job. Whether this is construction software or financial software, there are lots of different platforms managers can expect building estimators to use. When estimating within budget, you will often have problems that arise and deadlines that need to be met, so problem-solving and time-management skills are important soft skills. Having to work with people a lot will also require communication and leadership skills. How to become a building estimator A building estimator course is the first step in securing a position in this role. Most building estimators already have a job in the construction field and are ready to level up their careers as they move into a new and exciting position. CAL’s Certificate IV in Building Project Support (Estimator) (CPC40320) will afford you the skills you need to excel in a career as a building estimator. The units within this qualification will teach you how to develop project plans, calculate project, material, and labour costs, and monitor them accordingly. This estimating course is online and self-paced, giving an added advantage to those currently working. The convenience of flexible, online learning is that it allows you the chance to still work on-site and gain experience as you work at your own pace to secure this qualification. You also need on-the-job experience to become a building estimator, as you need to have an understanding of how construction sites work, and what legal requirements and codes of practice are necessary. Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE Building estimator salary With the skills and responsibilities that come with this position also comes a competitive pay rate. Upon completion of the Certificate IV in Building Project Support (Estimator) (CPC40320), you will have the necessary skills to be a great building estimator, with an average salary of $80,000. With an estimated 11.9% job growth over the next five years*, there is a certain layer of job security in this role, too. Jobs will continue to become available in this field, so becoming qualified now will set you up for success for years to come. *https://www.seek.com.au/career-advice/role/building-estimator Career pathways in the construction industry The construction industry is a strong industry constantly growing and withstanding economic concerns. In Australia, it generates over $360 billion in revenue, accounting for 9% of our Gross Domestic Product*. It makes it a strong career choice for those looking at the long term. *https://nationalindustryinsights.aisc.net.au/industries/construction Building estimators are a respected role that will see you through many years in the construction industry. A building estimation job is perfect for those wanting to stay in construction but get off the tools. If you like working with plans and numbers, this might be the right career path for you. If you’re ready to start your career as a building estimator, the Certificate IV in Building Project Support (Estimator) (CPC40320) is your first step to further your career in construction. Enquire now to find out more. Download our FREE 'Your Career in Building and Construction Management' Guide Find the latest information in our eBook about a career in construction management, including current job opportunities, skills you need, salary information and more. DOWNLOAD MY FREE GUIDE

site management vs registered builders

Site Manager vs Registered Builder: Which is Right For Me?

Are you ready to further your career in building and construction but unsure of what’s right for you? Working in this industry is exciting and some of the most popular roles include site manager or registered builder. Employers are looking for site managers and builders with a combination of hard and soft skills, so ensuring you have the exact skill set needed when applying for these roles allows you to stay ahead of the competition and get the job. In this article, we explore what site managers and builders do, the differences between them, and which one may be right for you. What does a site manager do? Site managers oversee and manage a construction project’s site requirements from start to finish. Site managers aren’t often on the tools themselves; they usually work directly on the worksites they manage. They may: Delegate tasks Coordinate the build Manage budgets Develop and execute project plans Advise on regulatory issues Uphold the work health and safety (WHS) of the site What skills do you need to be a site manager? The top skills required to succeed in a career in site management are: Project management Stakeholder management Problem-solving Knowledge of WHS Knowledge of specific building regulations Budget management Team and conflict management How to become a site manager A site manager is a senior role in construction, so becoming a site manager requires a combination of study and on-the-job experience. A great place to start is by acquiring a well-rounded qualification, such as a Certificate IV in Building & Construction (Site Management) (CPC40120). This is a perfect way to build a solid foundation of skills and start your career. An online site management course will also provide you with the flexibility you need to continue gaining experience on-site while you study. You’ll study units designed to upskill you in planning building work, managing construction teams, and applying building codes and standards. These units will also help you harness and gain the skills needed to further your career in building and construction. Upon completing the course, you will be well suited to a career involving any of the following roles: Construction Supervisor. Average salary: $89,000–$125,000 Contract Administrator. Average salary: $80,000–$124,000 Site Manager. Average salary: $78,000–$130,000 Download our FREE 'Your Career in Building and Construction Management' Guide Find the latest information in our eBook about a career in construction management, including current job opportunities, skills you need, salary information and more. DOWNLOAD MY FREE GUIDE   What does a builder do? A builder works on commercial and industrial projects to complete new builds, renovations and demolitions. Builders carry out specific tasks relating to the construction of buildings, including physical labour, operating machinery, and using tools. The day-to-day functions of a builder can vary depending on the nature and stage of the build. What skills do I need to be a builder? The top skills required to succeed as a registered builder are: Strong physical ability Uphold WHS standards of the site Ability to confidently use a wide variety of tools, including forklifts Communication and leadership Problem-solving Building and engineering knowledge Mathematical literacy Ability to use technology Registered builder vs unregistered builder Building professionals in Australia must be registered to work without significant restrictions. While working as an unregistered builder is technically possible, it limits and restricts your working capabilities greatly. Unregistered builders are only allowed to work on domestic projects under a value of $5,000, including labour and materials. Breaking these restrictions can result in prosecution. Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE   How to become a registered builder Becoming a registered builder is an essential step in creating a successful building career. With registration, you can work on diverse projects and carry out multiple services with no restriction on the value of the project. For those wanting to start their own business, it’s a must. Even if you’re not ready to start your own business, it’s still worthwhile for every builder to obtain their license. You should be aware that license requirements vary by state. Completing a qualification in building and construction is highly beneficial for those wanting a career as a registered builder. The Certificate IV in Building & Construction (Building) (CPC40120) will teach you the skills you need, including: How to select, procure and store construction materials for building and construction projects How to prepare simple building sketches and drawings How to apply legal requirements to building and construction projects Studying while working in the construction industry allows you to develop the hands-on skills necessary while you learn the technical and operational know-how through a self-paced qualification. Upskilling in your own time allows you the flexibility to earn a wage and grow your career simultaneously. Career pathways for builders A typical pathway for registered builders may look like the following: Gain a role on a building site as a building assistant, building labourer, or junior carpenter Complete a well-rounded qualification such as Certificate IV in Building & Construction (Building) Continue gaining experience in the building industry Apply for and receive your Builder’s License Secure a role as a registered builder. Average salary: $59,000–$106,000 As your experience develops, there are opportunities to work your way up in rank – whether this is on-site or to start your own business. It’s not uncommon for builders to transition into construction management or site management after significant experience in the industry. Site manager vs builder The building and construction industry is one of the largest in the country. It generates over $360 billion in revenue – around 9% of Australia’s GDP. On top of this, most workers are either sole traders or small businesses. This means you will almost always be able to find work. The building and construction industry is projected to grow even further over the next five years, making it an ideal choice for those looking for a long-term career option with plenty of growth opportunities. Whether you pursue a career in site management or believe becoming a registered builder is a better fit, you’ll find yourself challenged in your daily work and set on a stable career trajectory. If you resonate with the off-the-tools lifestyle and role type of site manager, our Certificate IV in Building and Construction (Site Management) (CPC40120) is a good place to develop from. On the other hand, if you align with the on-the-tools approach and feel better suited to a career as a builder, a Certificate IV in Building and Construction (Building) (CPC40120) can help you get there.   Discover your career in building and construction Explore courses designed to help you take your career to the next level! If you’re ready to expand your career, building estimator and contract administrator courses can help make that happen. View courses

contract administrator v project coordinator

How to Get a Builder’s Licence in Australia

In Australia, you must be licensed or registered if you want to be a builder or tradesperson. It is the responsibility of the licensed builder to ensure that the construction is compliant with all local, regional, and national regulations, and with worksite safety laws. Depending on your state or territory’s regulations, residential construction work that you need to have a building licence for might include: building new single houses, townhouses, duplexes, and new residential units, constructing extensions such as livings areas, bedrooms and enclosed attached garages to existing single houses and residential units, constructing or erecting a garage, carport or shed (including kits), bathroom, kitchen or laundry renovations, swimming pool building and enclosures and structural landscaping, house lifting (eg permanently raising the height of an existing structure), removing and resitting dwellings, saunas and steam rooms, or building retaining walls associated with the actual structure of a single house or residential unit. Every state and territory in Australia has its own builder licensing requirements, which range from education and experience to references and financial resources. Getting the relevant qualifications to meet your state or territory’s regulations is the first step in this process. Maintaining your licence or registration in some states/territories may also require that you attend ongoing training and development. Here is a summary of builder licensing requirements in each state and territory, as well as links to additional information. Builder’s Licence requirements in Australia Australian Capital Territory (ACT) Builder’s Licence requirements in the Australian Capital Territory In the ACT, the builder’s licence is classified into Class A, B, C, and D. You must hold a relevant qualification, pass the written examination, and have 2 years’ documented full-time building work experience before receiving a builder’s licence (A, B or C). Class D requires 3 years of work experience without holding a qualification and undertaking the examination. Types of Builder’s Licence in the ACT Class A builder (unlimited) For building work other than specialist building work. For building work of unlimited height on any Building Code of Australia (BCA) class of work. Class B builder (medium rise) For building work (other than specialist building work) in relation to a building that is three storeys or lower. For basic building work. Class C builder (low-rise residential) For building work (other than specialist building work) in relation to a building that is two storeys or lower and is a class 1, 2 or 10a building. For building work (other than specialist building work) in relation to a building that is a class 10b structure (other than a swimming pool or swimming pool fence) and is ancillary to a building that is two storeys or lower and is a class 1, 2 or 10a building. For basic building work. Class D builder For non-structural basic building work, other than specialist building work. Owner-builder licence For building work (other than specialist building work) in relation to a class 1, class 2 or class 10 building that is, or is to be, the licensee’s main home or ancillary to it. This licence can be obtained if you hold either a Class A, B, C, or D licence. For a full list of definitions, read more here. Experience requirements Class A, B and C require 2 years of documented full-time building work experience where 1 year of full-time experience was undertaken after the date the qualification was issued. Class D requires 3 years of documented full-time building work experience. Qualification requirements Class A builder (Unlimited) requires a tertiary qualification in building that the Australian Qualifications Framework Advisory has determined is a Bachelor’s degree, Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma, Masters’s Degree, or Doctoral Degree in Building (‘tertiary qualification in building’). Class B builder (Medium Rise) requires, one of the following: Diploma of Building and Construction (Building) with a course code of CPC50210, CPC50208 or BCG50206; or a tertiary qualification in building. Class C builder (Low rise / Residential up to 2 storeys) requires one of the following: Certificate IV in Building and Construction (Building) with a course code of CPC40110, CPC40108, or BCG40106; or Diploma Building and Construction (Building) with a course code of CPC50210, CPC50208 or BCG50206; or a tertiary qualification in building that the Australian Qualifications Framework Advisory Board has determined is a bachelor’s degree, graduate certificate, graduate diploma, master’s degree, or doctoral degree in the Australian Qualifications Framework System. Class D builder (non-structural work) does not require a formal qualification. Examination requirements Classes A, B, and C require you to pass a written examination set by the Construction Occupations Registrar before your builder licence is issued. You may make two attempts before your licence is refused. You must score at least 80% to pass your exam. Class D is exempted from examination. Licence Application Fee When applying for your builder’s licence in the ACT, you will need to collect your evidence of experience and qualification. Your fees will vary depending on which Class you are applying for, and whether you apply in-person or online.  Application Type Fee Individual licence in the construction occupation of Builder Occupation Classes A, B, and C, if the application is made online. $800.00 Individual licence in the construction occupation of Builder, Occupation Classes A, B and C, if the application is made in person or via post. $840.00 Individual licence in the construction occupation of Builder Occupation Class D, if the application is made online. $461.00 Individual licence in the construction occupation of Builder Construction Occupation Class D, if the application is made in person or via post. $506.00 Please note: this information was accurate at the time of publishing. Please check your state licensing body for the most current fees. ACT Licensing Body contact details ACT Planning and Land Authority – Environment, Planning and Sustainable Development Directorate www.planning.act.gov.au New South Wales (NSW) Builder’s Licence requirements in New South Wales You need a building licence before you can do any residential building work in NSW valued at more than $5000 (incl GST) in labour and materials. A general builder may do any work that is residential building work. There are different licence types in NSW, but you will need a contractor licence to be a residential builder. Experience requirements To apply for your NSW Builder’s Licence you must show at least 2 years’ relevant industry experience (obtained within the last 10 years) across a wide range of building construction work. In your documented experience, you must: have done work on sites under the supervision of a fully licensed builder have worked on the majority of the sites within 10 years of lodging your application “Experience” means that you gained the relevant experience as one of the following: An employee: employed by a building contractor. A subcontractor: holding an endorsed contractor licence and have contracted to a building contractor. A nominated supervisor: holding a qualified supervisor certificate where the contractor licence you are nominated supervisor for includes the category of full general building. There is also another nominated supervisor to cover the category of building. A nominated supervisor: holding a qualified supervisor certificate where the contractor licence you are nominated supervisor for has been subcontracting to a general building contractor. Qualification requirements In addition to 2 years’ relevant industry experience in the construction industry, you must have at least one of the following qualifications: VET qualifications and units of competencies: CPC40120 (current) Certificate IV in Building and Construction, or CPC40320 (current) Certificate IV in Building Project Support, or CPC40110 / BCG40106 / CPC40108 Certificate IV in Building and Construction (Building), or CPC40208 / BCG40206 Certificate IV in Building and Construction (Contract Administration), or BCG40306 / CPC40308 Certificate IV in Building and Construction (Estimating), or BCG40506 / CPC40508 Certificate IV in Building and Construction (Site Management), and including all of the following units: CPCCBC4001 (current) Apply building codes and standards to the construction process for Class 1 and 10 buildings, plus CPCCBC4053 (current) Apply building codes and standards to the construction process for Class 2 to 9 Type C buildings; or BCGBC4001A / CPCCBC4001A Apply building codes and standards to the construction process for low rise building projects, and CPCCBC4002 (current) Manage work health and safety in the building and construction workplace, or BCGBC4002A/ CPCCBC4002A Manage occupational health and safety in the building and construction workplace, and CPCCBC4003 (current) Select, prepare and administer a construction contract, or BCGBC4003A / CPCCBC4003A Select and prepare a construction contract, and CPCCBC4004 (current) / BCGBC4004A / CPCCBC4004A Identify and produce estimated costs for building and construction projects, and CPCCBC4005 (current) / BCGBC4005A / CPCCBC4005A Produce labour and material schedules for ordering, and CPCCBC4006 (current) / BCGBC4006A / CPCCBC4006A or CPCCBC4006B Select, procure and store construction materials for low rise projects, and CPCCBC4007 (current) / CGBC4007A / CPCCBC4007A Plan building or construction work, and CPCCBC4008 (current) Supervise site communication and administration processes for building and construction projects, or BCGBC4008A/ CPCCBC4008A/ CPCCBC4008B Conduct on-site supervision of the building and construction project, and CPCCBC4009 (current) / BCGBC4009A / CPCCBC4009A / CPCCBC4009B Apply legal requirements to building and construction projects, and CPCCBC4010 (current) Apply structural principles to residential and commercial constructions, or BCGBC4010A/ CPCCBC4010A/ CPCCBC4010B Apply structural principles to residential low-rise constructions, and BCGBC4011A/ CPCCBC4011A/ CPCCBC4011B. Apply structural principles to commercial low-rise constructions, and BSBESB407 (current) Manage finances for new business ventures, or BSBSMB421/ BSBSBM406/ BSBSMB406A Manage small business finances, and CPCCBC4012 (current) / CPCCBC4012B / BCGBC4012A / CPCCBC4012A Read and interpret plans and specifications, and CPCCBC4018 (current) / BCGBC4018A / CPCCBC4018A Apply site surveys and set out procedures to building and construction projects, and CPCCBC4024 (current) / BCGBC4024A / CPCCBC4024A Resolve business disputes Plus any of the following: a current carpentry or bricklaying contractor licence or qualified supervisor certificate, or an approved qualification that would allow the issue of such a  licence (for details of approved qualifications, see Carpentry or Bricklaying), or Diploma of Building and Construction (Building) – CPC50220 (current) / BCG50206 / CPC50208, or Diploma of Building and Construction (Building) CPC50210, and including the following units: CPCCBC5004 (current) / CPCCBC5004A Supervise and apply quality standards to the selection of building and construction materials, and CPCCBC5005 (current) / CPCCBC5005A Select and manage building and construction contractors, and CPCCBC5007 (current) / CPCCBC5007A or CPCCBC5007B Administer the legal obligations of a building and construction contract, and CPCCBC5009 (current) / CPCCBC5009A Identify services layout and connection methods in medium rise construction projects Bachelor of Housing from an Australian university or a degree in civil engineering, structural engineering, architecture, housing, construction, construction management, construction project management, construction economics, applied science (building) or quantity surveying from an Australian university OR A degree in building, construction, construction management, construction project management, construction economics, applied science (building), or quantity surveying from an Australian university which requires the applicant to undertake the equivalent of four years’ full-time study and a mandatory work placement. Builder’s Licence application costs In New South Wales, the following table of fees show the cost of applying for your licence. Application type 1-Year Fee 3-Year Fee 5-Year Fee Processing Fee Building contractor licence $745 $1396 $2439 $322 Tradesperson certificate $120 $161 $278 $100 Owner-builder permit $197 – – $76 Please note: this information was accurate at the time of publishing. Please check your state licensing body for the most current fees. NSW Licensing Body contact details Office of Fair Trading www.fairtrading.nsw.gov.au Northern Territory (NT) Builder’s Licence requirements in the Northern Territory In the Northern Territory, the licence category you need is a Building Contractor Residential Licence. These come as both Restricted and Unrestricted categories. Most builders only need a Restricted Licence to carry out domestic builds. To find the licence that best suits you, find out the full list of differences between licences here. Experience requirements You will need a minimum 3 years’ practical experience in carrying out relevant building work. Qualification requirements To be eligible for this registration as an individual you must: hold a Certificate IV in Building and Construction or equivalent; provide a resume and project list detailing three years practical experience in carrying out relevant building work; have at least three written references from registered building practitioners who can verify your experience; be a fit and proper person to hold the registration; and provide a Net Assets Certificate from your accountant showing you have net tangible assets of at least $50,000. Builder’s Licence application costs In the Northern Territory, the following table of fees show the cost of applying for your licence. Application Type Fee Individual registration $1168 ($292 on application and $876 on approval) Owner builder $292 Please note: this information was accurate at the time of publishing. Please check your state licensing body for the most current fees. NT Licensing Body contact details Building Practitioners Board bpb.nt.gov.au/ Queensland (QLD) Builder’s Licence requirements in Queensland There are three main building licences in Queensland. To obtain a builder’s licence to work on residential builds, the licence category you need is a Builder – Low Rise. This licence category consists of a contractor’s licence and a site supervisor’s licence. Types of Builder’s Licence in QLD Builder – Low Rise Building work on a class 1 or class 10 building. Building work on classes 2 to 9 buildings with a gross floor area not more than 2000m², but not including Type A or Type B construction. Building work that consists of non-structural work on a building, regardless of— the class of the building; or the gross floor area of the building. Prepare plans and specifications if the plans and specifications are: for the licensee’s personal use, or for use in building work to be performed by the licensee personally. Builder – Medium Rise Building work on a class 1 or class 10 building. Building work to a maximum of 3 storeys, but not including Type A construction on classes 4 to 9 buildings. Building work that consists of non-structural work on a building, regardless of— the class of the building; or the gross floor area of the building. Prepare plans and specifications if the plans and specifications are: for the licensee’s personal use, or for use in building work to be performed by the licensee personally. Builder – Open Building work on all classes of buildings Prepare plans and specifications that are: for the licensee’s personal use, or for use in building work to be performed by the licensee personally. For a full list of the class of buildings and type of constructions, read more here. Experience requirements If you are qualified in bricklaying/block laying or carpentry, you need a minimum two years’ experience in the licence class scope of work (or other work the Commission is satisfied is at least equivalent to experience in the scope of work for the class). For all other applicants, you need a minimum four years’ experience in the licence class scope of work (or other work the Commission is satisfied is at least equivalent to experience in the scope of work for the class). Qualification requirements For the contractor portion of the licence, you will need any one of the following: Successful completion of Certificate IV in Building and Construction (CPC40120); Successful completion of a course the Commission considers is at least equivalent to the course mentioned in paragraph (a); A recognition certificate as a builder qualified to carry out the scope of work for the licence class; or A qualification or statement of attainment of required competency for the class of licence. For the site supervisor portion of the licence, you need any one of the following: The technical qualification stated above; successful completion of the following units of competency— Apply building codes and standards to the construction process for Class 1 and 10 buildings CPCCBC4001; Apply building codes and standards to the construction process for Class 2 to 9 Type C buildings CPCCBC4053; Manage work health and safety in the building and construction workplace CPCCBC4002; Plan building and construction work CPCCBC4007; Supervise site communication and administration processes for building and construction projects CPCCBC4008; Apply legal requirements to building and construction projects CPCCBC4009; Apply structural principles to residential and commercial constructions CPCCBC4010; Read and interpret plans and specifications CPCCBC4012; Apply site surveys and set-out procedures to building and construction projects CPCCBC4018; and Lead team effectiveness BSBLDR414; successful completion of a course or units of competency of a course the commission considers is at least equivalent to the units of competency mentioned in paragraph (b). Other requirements You will need to provide written references from three builders who can confirm your supervisory experience. You may be required to provide information or make a declaration that shows you meet the minimum financial requirements (minimum net tangible assets) to ensure your business is financially sound and stable. Builder’s Licence application costs When applying for a contractor-type licence the fees you pay are determined by your annual turnover (maximum revenue—MR). Max Revenue (MR) Category Fee MR up to $200,000 p.a. (Not available to builders) $683.05—SC1 MR up to $800,000 p.a. $832.92—SC2 MR up to $12 million p.a. $1067.70—Cat 1-2 MR over $12 million p.a. $1534.79—Cat 3-7 Please note: this information was accurate at the time of publishing. Please check your state licensing body for the most current fees. QLD Licensing Body contact details Queensland Building and Construction Commission www.qbcc.qld.gov.au/ South Australia (SA) Builder’s Licence requirements in South Australia In South Australia, to obtain a builder’s licence to work on residential builds, the licence category you need is a Building Works Supervisor Registration. Experience requirements You will need to provide a detailed work history of practical experience at the level of registration the applicant is applying for. Qualification requirements Applicants for building work contractor licences for any building work will need to meet qualification requirements. An applicant must show their successful completion of six of the following units of competency issued by a Registered Training Organisation: BSBESB407 Manage finances for new business ventures; or BSBSMB421 Manage small business finances; or BSBESB403 Plan finances for new business ventures; or BSBSMB402 Plan small business finances; or BSBESB401 Research and develop business plans; or BSBSMB404 Undertake small business planning. and CPCCBC4009 Apply legal requirements to building and construction projects; or CPCCBC4009B Apply legal requirements to building and construction projects; or BSBESB402 Establish legal and risk management requirements of new business ventures; or BSBSMB401 Establish legal and risk management requirements of small business. and CPCCBC4007 Plan building and construction work; or CPCCBC4007A Plan building or construction work. CPCCBC4004 Identify and produce estimated costs for building and construction projects; or CPCCBC4004A Identify and produce estimated costs for building and construction projects. CPCCBC4003A Select and prepare a construction contract. CPCCBC4024 Resolve business disputes; or CPCCBC4024A Resolve Business Disputes. If the builder currently holds a building work contractor licence or plumbing, gas fitting or electrical contractor licence, they only need to show they have completed four of the following units of competency: CPCCBC4007 Plan building and construction work; or CPCCBC4007A Plan building or construction work. CPCCBC4004 Identify and produce estimated costs for building and construction projects; or CPCCBC4004A Identify and produce estimated costs for building and construction projects. CPCCBC4003A Select and prepare a construction contract. CPCCBC4024 Resolve business disputes; or CPCCBC4024A Resolve Business Disputes. Builder’s Licence application costs An application fee must be paid at the time of applying for your builder’s licence.  General building work and supervisor’s registration – $990.00. Please note: this information was accurate at the time of publishing. Please check your state licensing body for the most current fees. Other requirements People who do ‘specified building work’ – eg bricklayers, carpenters – need to have at least $10,000 in net assets to apply for a contractor’s licence. *https://www.sa.gov.au/topics/business-and-trade/licensing/building-and-trades/building-work-contractor-s-licence SA Licensing Body contact details South Australia Consumer and Business Services www.cbs.sa.gov.au Tasmania (TAS) Builder’s Licence requirements in Tasmania In Tasmania, the licence category you need is a Builder (General Construction). A general builder is responsible for managing or carrying out construction, demolition, alteration, addition, relocation or repair of any building or structure. Each class of licensed builder is further divided into sub-classes of Low Rise, Medium Rise and Open. The General Construction class also has a sub-class of Domestic. These sub-classes determine the scope of work of licensees. For information on each licence category, view the full list here. Experience requirements Builder Domestic, Builder (Low Rise), and Builder (Medium Rise) Two years experience at the same level of responsibility for the scope of work, for applicants with a building trade qualification (carpentry, bricklaying, etc.), orFour years experience at the same level of responsibility for the scope of work, for those applicants without a trade qualification. Builder (open) Three years experience at the same level of responsibility for the scope of work, for applicants with a building trade qualification (carpentry, bricklaying, etc.) orSix years’ experience at the same level of responsibility for the scope of work, for those applicants without a trade qualification. Qualification requirements Builder (Domestic) and Builder (Low Rise) The qualification requirement for these licences is the Certificate IV in Building & Construction (Building) (CPC40120). Builder (Medium Rise) The qualification needed for this licence is the Diploma of Building & Construction (Building) (CPC50220). Builder (Open) The qualification needed for this licence are the Advanced Diploma of Building and Construction Management (CPC60220) or a relevant building degree. Other requirements As a licence holder, you are required to maintain and develop skills and knowledge through ongoing learning activities known as Continuing Professional Development or CPD. Read more about your requirements for a builder’s licence in Tasmania here. TAS Licensing Body contact details Consumer, Building and Occupational Services (CBOS) www.cbos.tas.gov.au/ Victoria (VIC) Builder’s Licence requirements in Victoria In Victoria a building licence for residential builders is called Domestic Builder Registration. For the full list of limited licences, find out more here. Types of Builder’s Licence in VIC Domestic Builder (Unlimited) Registration To build a complete home or carry out significant residential building work you need a Domestic Builder (Unlimited) Registration. Domestic Builder (Limited) Registration To carry out a single trade and work for consumers you usually need a Domestic Builder (Limited) Registration. A Domestic Builder (Limited) Registration may also be used by builders who install kitchens, bathrooms and laundries or build non-habitable structures such as sheds. Experience requirements To be registered as a Domestic Builder in Victoria you need to prove that you have the sufficient practical experience to carry out the tasks of a builder. This practical experience usually needs to be well-rounded and includes experience with quotes and contracts, obtaining building approvals, engaging workers, resolving problems, and having work completed and handed over. An applicant for registration as a Domestic Builder (Unlimited) needs to prove they have at least 3 years’ practical experience. An applicant for registration as a Domestic Builder (Limited) needs to prove at least 2 years’ practical experience. Qualification requirements Along with practical experience, builders wishing to obtain their Domestic Builder licence also must have certain qualifications.  These qualifications differ on the type of work wishing to be undertaken, and the level of experience held by the contractor.  Many applicants for builder registration, including a Domestic Builder (Unlimited), have a CPC40120 Certificate IV in Building and Construction and demonstrate to the VBA by exams and assessments that they have the equivalent skills and experience to the prescribed qualifications. To become a Domestic Builder (Unlimited) you must have one of the following: a Bachelor of Construction Management and Economics or a Bachelor of Construction Management (Honours) or a Diploma of Building and Construction (Building) (CPC50210 or CPC50220). Becoming a Domestic Builder (Limited) will depend on the area and class of building work wanting to be done. For example, for a Domestic Builder (Limited to the construction of swimming pools and spas) licence, you would need a Certificate IV in Swimming Pool and Spa Building (CPC40808 or CPC40820). However if you were after a limited licence such as the Domestic Builder (Limited to bathroom, kitchen, and laundry renovation), you would need a MSF31113 Certificate III in cabinet making. You can view the full list of limited licences and their relevant qualification requirements here. Builder’s Licence application costs When applying for a contractor-type licence the fees you pay are determined by your annual turnover (maximum revenue—MR). Application type (Individual) Fee Domestic Builder (Unlimited) $920 Domestic Builder (Limited) $736 Please note: this information was accurate at the time of publishing. Please check your state licensing body for the most current fees. VIC Licensing Body contact details Victorian Building Authority (VBA) https://www.vba.vic.gov.au/ Western Australia (WA) Builder’s Licence requirements in Western Wustralia In Western Australia, the licence category you need is a Building Practitioner Registration. Experience and qualification requirements There are multiple pathways to apply under, each with different requirements. These are called sets, and you can choose the set that most closely fits your experience and qualifications. The most common and straightforward pathway, Set 1, will see you needing both: A completed the CPC50220 or CPC50210 Diploma of Building and Construction (Building) as described in the CPC and CPC08; and Seven years experience in carrying out or supervising building work. Find out more about different pathways and sets to get your builder’s licence in Western Australia here. WA Licensing Body contact details Western Australia Building Commission www.commerce.wa.gov.au/building-and-energy Please note: This information is subject to change. Be sure to check with the regulating bodies, listed below, for the most up-to-date requirements. Download our FREE 'Your Career in Construction Management' Guide Find the latest information in our eBook about a career in construction management, including current job opportunities, soft skills you need, salary information and more. DOWNLOAD MY FREE GUIDE Your next step Learn more about a career in the building and construction industry or enquire for a CPC40120 Certificate IV in Building & Construction (Building) to kickstart your journey toward earning a Builder’s Licence.

Civil Engineer Career Opportunities

How to upskill as a civil engineer and find better job opportunities Engineering is a highly respectable and sought-after career with a variety of pathways and career opportunities. One of the most popular and common is civil engineering. Civil engineers work on the design, construction, and maintenance of physically built objects and to ensure the safety and structural integrity of infrastructure. Projects can include bridges, dams, airports, pipelines, elements of buildings, railways, and much more. Although the job itself can be stressful and challenging, there are plenty of payoffs and rewards that make civil engineering a worthwhile career. One of the many benefits is the salary. Engineers, generally, are paid well, with the average salary in Australia sitting around $110,000 per year. Engineers generally are paid well, with average salary sitting around $110,000 per year. Engineers who make the smart move into management positions, however, can earn around $160,000 per year on average for their role. Click To Tweet For those with experience and training, the reward is greater still. Engineers who develop their careers into management positions average an income of around $160,000 per year for their role. An engineer manager salary is a goal that many less qualified civil engineers aspire to reach. So how can a civil engineer move into a management position? How can you become an engineer in management? Most civil engineers, once they have completed their degrees, and are qualified, will head out into their respective industries and work to gain as much experience and practical knowledge as possible. Doing this is incredibly beneficial in your overall career pathway. To advance your career, you should be able to demonstrate a dedication to your industry as well as a good level of experience. However, knowledge is key to developing your career in this instance. To make your way up the ranks in an engineering field, you need to have something that sets you apart from your colleagues and competition. By choosing to upskill with a diploma, you are actively furthering your knowledge by educating yourself in a way that will benefit your career. This level of dedication and initiative will be looked upon favourably by existing and potential employers. A Diploma of Project Management (BSB50820) can dramatically set you apart from others seeking to move into a managerial role by providing hands-on, practical knowledge that will apply to real-life situations. You will gain valuable skills that will help you to further your career. Project management skills important for a civil engineer Civil engineers have all the practical engineering skills from their previous study and experience, which is a great start. What you might be lacking are the management skills that can only be gained when you undertake further study, like the project management diploma. Core skills you will acquire when from this diploma are managing project quality, project cost and time, project risk, and project information and communication. There are many other subjects you will be able to study to suit your interests. Not only that, but you will have the opportunity to undertake elective classes that will add a deeper level of knowledge and skill to your arsenal. These electives involve a variety of things like managing procurement, stakeholder engagement, team effectiveness, and much more. One of the most significant elements of undertaking a further qualification with the College for Adult Learning is the incredible flexibility. All courses are online, meaning you can choose how long it takes you to complete your study, as well as when and where, meaning you can easily study from the comfort of your very own home. If you need to continue working, which many people do, this is a great option that would allow you to study nights and weekends with no issues. CAL’s coaches are readily available to help you through the process, and you’ll feel in control and ready to achieve your highest potential. Alternative careers for civil engineers Loving your industry and not your job is a common situation for aspiring engineers. Not wanting to leave the industry you enjoy and have gained experience in is understandable. If you are a civil engineer who isn’t feeling satisfied with your role anymore, management might be a motivating career option for you. You might need to change careers for a variety of different reasons. You may seek a better income, be returning to work after starting a family, moving to a new city or country, or feel like your opportunities have simply run dry where you are now. Sometimes it might just be as simple as wanting to do something different, someplace different. Management, as a civil engineer, may be perfect for someone who is looking to transition to work from home. While some of the tasks may require you to visit a site, most work can be done from home nowadays. Meetings can be conducted on Zoom or similar platforms, and paperwork and reports can be completed and filed remotely, making it an accessible career option for many people. Upskilling to include a Diploma of Project Management (BSB50820) into your qualification bank will be beneficial. These new skills will open doors for you that you hadn’t previously thought about before. The opportunities for civil engineers to grow and develop successful management careers are out there if you are willing to put in the effort to build yourself and your skills to reach that point. Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE

Best Qualifications Needed to Succeed in the Mining Industry

Succeeding in the mining industry requires project management skills to keep several balls in the air at once. An average day can include tasks like managing large workforces, engaging contractors, sourcing plant and other equipment, keeping a close eye on budgets, and much more. An obvious first step on the path to such a career is a Diploma of Project Management (BSB50820), a Diploma of Building and Construction Management (CPC50320), or both. Management in mining is a very high earning career for good reason, as a talented project manager or construction manager can save an employer from substantial losses on big mining projects through experience, staying calm under pressure, and being pragmatic. With the average worker in the mining industry earning $100,000 or more, it's not hard to see why a management career in this industry is an excellent path to pursue. Click To Tweet Both qualifications are incredibly useful in the mining industry, and a double diploma has the potential to accelerate your earning ability in the mining sphere, where the average worker earns $100,000 per year or more. These qualifications are equally as helpful to those already working in the mining industry as it is to those wanting to join it. So, what’s the next step? Careers in the mining industry The mining industry’s sheer scale means there are dozens of career paths associated with it in Australia. Creating and commissioning an open-cut mine is estimated to cost at least $500 million (and usually far more). This represents an enormous investment, and it takes many years to recover start-up costs before making a profit. That means a lot of skilled workers with a diverse range of specialties are required. Truck drivers, riggers, excavators, crane operators and maintenance technicians play a pivotal role ‘on the tools’, while there’s a host of supervisory and management positions that require filling too. Workers who have spent time in more labour-intensive mining jobs, and who develop a real connection to the industry, see the advantages of transitioning to careers in the project or construction management sphere. Some do so to capitalise on their experience, create a work/family life balance, or because heavy manual labour is no longer an attractive option. Getting qualified in management at a diploma level is an essential prerequisite for these roles. The College for Adult Learning offers integrated diploma courses, with learning coaches and mining industry experts available to help. Online courses can be undertaken at the students’ own pace, 24/7, in order to maximise career potential. Project Management and Building Construction Management qualifications are helpful for opening doors to senior roles in one of our country’s great industries. Getting a double diploma in both disciplines gives employers more reason to consider you for relevant roles and promotion pathways. Although mining activity is mostly tied to resource prices, even ‘slow’ periods are incredibly important to Australia’s financial fortunes. Iron ore exports alone are worth roughly $100 billion every year to our economy. It’s a large scale, high-stakes industry which sets platinum standards for employees in return for good wages and career prospects. Project managers are at the pinnacle of these opportunities. As such, project managers and construction managers in mining, require sound communication and leadership skills, a first-rate ability to plan major projects involving thousands of employees, a solid understanding of workplace OHS procedures, attention to detail, and more. Overseeing projects which may require billions of dollars in infrastructure investment brings a unique level of pressure. Making decisions under such time and financial constraints come with the territory, so a solid understanding of finance is critical. All these skills start with formal qualifications such as a Diploma of Project Management (BSB50820) or Building and Construction Management, even if you’ve already gained experience in the mining industry. AIPM-Endorsed Diploma CAL has received endorsement for our Diploma of Project Management (BSB50820) and Diploma of Project Management (specialising in Construction) (BSB50820) courses from the Australian Institute of Project Management (AIPM), the premier, longest-serving body for project management in Australia. Having passed a rigorous review by AIPM auditors, adding an AIPM-endorsed diploma to your repertoire demonstrates your commitment to project management professional development and the elevation of industry practices. How to get into the mining industry More than 230,000 Australians work in the mining industry, a figure that’s increased by 4.6% in the past five years. That represents almost 2% of the entire Australian workforce, which gives you an idea of its’ importance to the broader economy. In the next five years, that workforce is expected to grow by a further 20,000, so there is still plenty of employment opportunities going. At entry-level, you’re more likely to be engaged in roles that don’t involve fly-in fly-out (FIFO) work, as mining companies tend to employ more experienced workers at these sites. Most entry-level vacancies are found in regional operations and can involve long-term relocation to work on-site. In the next 5 years, the mining workforce is expected to grow by a further 20,000 roles. Click To Tweet Getting qualifications in fields like civil, electrical or mechanical engineering is a definite advantage, as is most trades. There are also many types of ‘tickets’, or licenses and training qualifications available, in more specific areas of mining. However, these can be very expensive and possibly better undertaken once you’ve secured a job. Like any industry, establishing contacts within mining (and maintaining them) is an excellent way to hear of any opportunities as soon as they arise. Recruitment and labour-hire companies can also help provide advice on your career into mining, specific to your situation. Gaining a foot in the door in the best start to get as much experience as you can in the various aspect of mining. How to Upskill and Achieve a Qualification When Working FIFO Many employers offer short or long-term work placements for potential employees who are undertaking study, to give them a first-hand look at the industry for which they have a real passion. Getting the right qualifications can allow you to specialise in other aspects of the mining industry, such as transport infrastructure, building inspection, or health and safety fields. A double diploma in Project Management or Building Construction Management sets you on the path to these and many other specialties within the mining industry. The College for Adult Learning’s online diploma courses let you organise study around other commitments, with the bonus of achieving qualifications that are recognised Australia-wide. A day in the life of a mining project manager Think of the project or construction manager as the ringmaster of a fast-paced, dynamic, high-stakes arena. They are, by definition, the critical point of contact for everyone working on or off-site. They plan, direct, and execute almost every level of operations. Although delegation is an essential aspect of the role, the buck ultimately stops with the project or construction manager. They are responsible for adherence to strict building regulations, liaising with architects and engineers, maintaining quality control, and possibly supervising multiple sites. Therefore, it makes sense that ‘hands-on’ experience in the mining industry is of enormous benefit to succeeding as a manager. A well-rounded project manager will understand the day-to-day challenges from multiple points of view. They will have the respect of their team because they possess the qualifications, experience, and ability to keep an eye on the ‘bigger picture’. Lay the foundations for a study path to the best jobs in the mining industry Laying the foundations for a leadership role in mining can open many doors, offer excellent financial rewards and almost limitless opportunities in mining.Like any project, beginning with the end in mind is crucial to success. Set a long-term goal for where you are heading and work backwards from the future to where you are now. Then plan out a study path that will get you there for the best value and in the shortest time. Take advantage of career and learning coaching to assist you in making the best choices for you. Selecting the right diploma qualification for you will make for a strong beginning for your future success in the mining industry. Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE

How Project and Construction Diplomas Can Get You A Job

Construction remains the big Australian employer Each year, Australia’s construction industry contributes about $350 billion to the economy, roughly 8% of our gross domestic product. Even when the property market hit rock bottom in mid-2019 (after reaching its peak 18 months earlier), construction continued to employ about a million people. The Australian Industry and Skills Committee predicted in 2018 that the construction industry would have an annual average growth rate of 2.5% for the following five years, despite the recent downturn. Productivity is increasing too, as better technology, improved building techniques, and more efficient materials help drive smarter and more cost-effective construction processes. It follows that those in positions of seniority within the industry are highly sought after, and very well compensated financially. At the top of that pile are Project Managers and Construction Managers. Each year, Australia's construction industry contributes about $350 billion to the economy, which is roughly 8% of our GDP. Despite the property market hitting rock bottom mid-2019, construction still employed about 1 million people. Click To Tweet What’s the difference? A construction manager’s focus is centred squarely on the building phase of the project, whereas a project manager oversees everything including planning, budgets, contracts, marketing, and more. Knowing this, what is the value of a Construction Management Diploma or Project Management Diploma through College for Adult Learning? How valuable might one of these diplomas be in an industry which constantly requires senior roles to guide and inspire hundreds of workers on multi-million-dollar worksites? Construction Management Diploma Outcomes The average salary for a construction manager in Australia is $112,000, but the best of the best can command $187,000 or more. Project managers do even better, with an average wage of $127,000, and the best paid earning north of $249,000. Like any salary of that magnitude, it is a reflection of many factors including demand, qualifications, skills, experience and leadership abilities. These professionals are well-remunerated for a good reason. Construction Managers are ultimately responsible for not just the building’s integrity but require skills (and diplomacy) to serve the interests of major contractors, subcontractors, and often buyers. Project Management Diploma Outcomes Project Managers have an even longer list of responsibilities and stakeholders to keep happy. In other words, the buck stops with them when there’s often a lot of money at stake, and investors are counting on a good job to get a decent rate of return. Then there’s the issue of regulation. The building trade is overseen in all sectors and occupations at local, state, and federal government level with a multitude of rules and regulations. It follows that staying updated on those rules is an important aspect of both construction and project managers’ job. All this means that, more than ever, having the right qualifications is crucial. An important step on the pathway to either career is the right qualification. Think of it as the ultimate investment in yourself towards getting a well-paid career that offers stability, variety, excitement, and great job satisfaction. The value of the Project and Construction management Diplomas The College for Adult Learning’s Construction Management and Project Management diplomas are recognised throughout the industry. Their nationally accredited training gives you the foundation to get a ‘foot in the door’, or get you closer to that promotion you’ve been chasing if you’re already in the industry. Diplomas can be completed at your own pace, although the typical length of time is between 12-16 months for a course. You can study online with fantastic coaching and student support, at convenient times that suit you. There are currently approximately 25,000 Australian-based construction or project management roles advertised on SEEK alone. That means the market is begging for talent, so there’s evidence of outstanding outcomes by completing either diploma. Showing a prospective employer your commitment to the industry (and learning all you can about it) is a positive demonstration of your work ethic and dedication. Plus, you’ll learn even more about the construction game, and therefore broaden your choice of jobs down the track. See the comparison below: Single Diploma of Building & Construction Management (CPC50320) = 15 units Single Diploma of Project Management (BSB50820) = 12 units Single Diploma of Project Management (specialising in Construction) (BSB50820) = 12 units What does the future hold for residential and commercial jobs? About a third of all construction projects in Australia are residential. People will always need houses, of course, but projections are that in the next three years, that will decrease from 36% to 32% of the market. Commercial construction is expected to help fill the void. Managing a commercial project is usually more complicated than a residential one, so construction and project managers with the right qualifications have a bright employment outlook for the future. Experts are also predicting a swing towards modular and prefabricated construction projects, as technology improves, and cost control becomes more of an issue. Keeping across trends like that is much easier if you can gain experience and credibility in the industry. Couple these factors with more government investment in infrastructure (state and federal), it becomes clear that construction and project management are careers of the future. Getting a solid understanding provided by a diploma in either or both disciplines is a smart move for those looking to future-proof their career. What is next for managers in the construction sector? By all counts, it seems that diploma outcomes in the fields of both construction and project management are bright. Both roles require a solid educational base to make you more employable. Beyond that, an exciting and rewarding industry awaits. Managers at this level need a strong initiative, the ability to work calmly under pressure, great communication skills and solid personal drive. Undertaking a diploma qualification, in and of itself, demonstrates all these qualities. Having the ambition and enthusiasm to commit to an online diploma, even one you complete at your own pace, are attractive qualities in any workplace. The value of the project management or construction management diploma isn’t just to give you the qualifications you need. A respected diploma qualification demonstrates to any potential employer that you are serious and committed to the long term success of the company and the future of the construction and related industries. Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE  

How to Start your Own Business as a Tradie

When you are starting your own business as a tradie, there are lots of things to consider, from funding to competition and plenty more. When every detail, no matter how small, is not considered, we see small businesses that fail to succeed. The figures show that 60% of Australian small businesses close within the first three years of operation. The Bureau of Statistics recognises 2.1 million small businesses in Australia currently, but in the last financial year, 54,922 of them did not survive. So why is this happening? Why are so many of Australia’s small businesses including tradies not getting off to a strong start right out of the gates? Top five reasons businesses fail 1. Wrong motivation If you are starting your business to make a lot of money quickly, you probably want to reconsider your motivation. Often, if not always, start-ups require a large amount of funding, which usually comes directly from the owner’s pockets. 2. Poor management Many businesses report their failure is due to the leadership team not having an effective management strategy. If, as an owner, you can’t identify issues and ways to rectify them, your business will struggle to cope with the ups and downs of being newly opened. 3. Inadequate funding If you don’t have the money to invest in your business, and you can’t find investors willing to hand over the cash, your business may have trouble staying afloat. Before starting your business, consider any legal fees, employee salaries, manufacturing and distribution costs, etc. Also, consider putting extra cash aside for any surprising costs that occur. 4. Wrong market Location, location, location! If you set up your business in an area where there is already a large amount of competition, or your target market isn’t large, you may struggle to find your feet. Make sure you consider the best place to set up the business that will see trade flow smoothly. 5. Lack of planning As the famous saying goes “if you fail to plan, you plan to fail”. Without the proper know-how to run a business, every element of your company is going to struggle to find success. These facts might be daunting to think about, but they shouldn’t stop you from going after your dream of owning a business. Trades are highly sought after and frequently utilised, so the market exists and is booming. To help ensure your success, consider the following tips when starting your company. Five top tips for business success 1. Research Before you make any concrete decisions, research your target market and the sector you want to enter. If you are an electrician by trade who wants to start their own business, look at the area you want to service and consider how many other companies are set up in the same area. If you want to become a builder, do you have the relevant builder’s licence? What are you going to do to be different and stand out? 2. Plan Once you have finished your research, it’s time to come up with a business model and plan. Consider your challenges, goals, and the strategies you will use to overcome any obstacles that land your way. A return to study can support your planning and confidence. Starting your own business as a tradie has the same hurdles and difficulties as any other small business. Completing a Certificate IV in Entrepreneurship and New Business (BSB40320) can assist you in developing the skills needed to create a successful trade business. 3. Have the money organised Knowing your budget is one thing: having money available is another thing entirely. Whether you are funding your business yourself, getting a loan, or you are relying on investors, be sure you have the cash lined up and ready to go. 4. Be passionate If you aren’t personally invested in the work you want to do, there is a good chance you won’t be successful. Although it will be stressful, you still have to feel a passion and a determination for the work you will be doing and for running the business. 5. You don’t have to do it alone Consider whether bringing in a business partner is the right move for you. Would it benefit you to start off having extra knowledge, someone to bounce ideas off, and more funds? Do you have what it takes to start a trade business? Each of the above strategies can be put in place when you are starting your business to ensure your success. However, one of the most important decisions you make that could be the difference between success and failure is education. Whether you already have a diploma or are considering getting one, you can make for your business. Project Management (BSB50820, Leadership & Management (BSB50420) or Building & Construction Management (CPC50320) qualifications would all provide you with skills and knowledge to benefit your start-up business. By following these strategies and seeking further training, your tradie business will start on a strong foot, with you as a competent, knowledgeable, and dedicated leader. Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE

Why You will Stand Out as a Qualified Construction Project Manager

If you are considering a return to study, it is important to know how and why you will stand out as a qualified construction project manager. Financial gain Dozens of trades and professions make up the construction industry and project managers are among the most sought after for leadership positions. Competent and experienced professionals are financially rewarded for pursuing exciting career opportunities. The average Australian Project Manager wage is upwards of $85,000, but the best and brightest construction project managers with up-to-date knowledge can easily earn more than $140,000. There are few careers where you can prepare the groundwork for a project and oversee every stage of the process right through to completion. Many project managers describe the completion of a job as the most satisfying part of their work. A post-tertiary qualification such as a Diploma of Project Management (BSB51415) and Diploma of Building & Construction (Management) (CPC50320) can be the best choice to set you on the path to the most rewarding of careers. What's your Management Trajectory? Are you wondering how far away you are from your next promotion? Take our quiz to assess your management career pathway. GO TO QUIZ Knowledge Construction project managers are ultimately responsible for the completion of expensive projects. The oversight and decisions of construction managers are crucial to success. The best in the field use every tool at their disposal to coordinate dozens of tasks that all need completing to strict deadlines. Every day they turn to the latest technology to help them. Their vision is shared with dozens of people to reach milestones and see progress. The right educational qualification can give leaders the confidence to know they’ve got the skills to help them to succeed, and allow the team to trust the leaders. No two days are the same, and you’ll be dealing with a variety of people and challenges. There are costs to plan, budgets to manage, subcontractors to hire, frequent briefings with stakeholders, and a multitude of other tasks. Competent people management skills and patience are required in equal measure, as every decision is ultimately geared to delivering projects on time and budget. AIPM-Endorsed Diploma CAL has received endorsement for our Diploma of Project Management (BSB50820) and Diploma of Project Management (specialising in Construction) (BSB50820) courses from the Australian Institute of Project Management (AIPM), the premier, longest-serving body for project management in Australia. Having passed a rigorous review by AIPM auditors, adding an AIPM-endorsed diploma to your repertoire demonstrates your commitment to project management professional development and the elevation of industry practices. Gone are the days when a construction manager might leave school at age fifteen for a building apprenticeship, and spend 25-30 years climbing the career ladder towards their first project management role. Now, a qualification can quickly set you apart from the crowd, giving you a foot in the door that might otherwise take years or even decades. One of the advantages of a qualification like a Certificate IV in Project Management Practice (BSB40920) is that it opens up a world of opportunities. Virtually all construction project management skills translate to any work site. Employers also understand the value of engaging qualified individuals. Employers also look for their employees’ ambition, endeavour, adaptability, and flexibility. When it comes to standing out in a field with equally qualified candidates, those are great assets for any construction project manager.  Construction offers plenty of opportunities for career progression, with high job growth across the country. According to Labour Market Insights, Construction Manager roles are set to grow by 10.2% in the next 5 years, making it a lucrative career to become qualified in. Take the first step Project management skills in any industry can be similar in many respects. While experience counts, good communication and planning skills are critical, as is a good work ethic. Flexibility is also vital. For example, a busy construction industry means it’s harder to source labour, like tradespeople. Conversely, a quieter period means a manager’s focus will shift to sourcing projects rather than subcontractors. A Certificate IV in Project Management Practice (BSB40920) will teach you the project scoping and planning skills to take the first step into a project management position in construction. If you already have extensive experience to upskill into a senior construction management role, a qualification such as the Diploma of Project Management (Specialising in Construction) (BSB50820) will fast-track you there. Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE

How to Manage Generational Differences on a Construction Worksite

A skilled construction supervisor will need to know how to manage generational differences on a work site. Anybody who’s spent a career on construction sites can tell you how much the industry has changed in recent years, and not just by replacing the lunchtime meat pie and iced coffee with sushi and a kombucha! A new generation of workers is bringing modern thinking to a workplace that has changed very little since World War Two. That pace of change is rapidly increasing. Within a decade, full-scale digitisation is expected to add up to $25 billion in value to Australia’s commercial construction sector alone. Driving these changes will be younger workers with new ways of thinking. So how can you ensure younger generations integrate with those who’ve spent their working lives on a job site?   Do it first, do it right Tradespeople will invest in software when it saves time and money, and is easy to understand. If a site manager is shown how clients, suppliers and subcontractors can be updated on a worksite’s progress all at once with the click of a smartphone, it won’t take long to get them onside. Finding the right software to suit might seem like common sense to a 20-something newbie, but it’s far less so to a tradie without technology exposure. Don’t underestimate the positive influence an enthusiastic apprentice can have on more experienced colleagues.   Learning a new language A construction site could have up to five different generations employed at any one time. The oldest may have been happy to let managerial opportunities pass them by, but remain fiercely loyal. The youngest won’t just be the most tech-savvy but can expect to have many jobs in their lifetime. Each generation will speak a slightly different ‘language’, so it’s important to get through to them all. In this context, workplace mentoring can guide all generations. It’s as valuable to let older workers share their experiences, as it is to let millennials have their say. Each generation will be motivated by different things, which is an important distinction for promoting workplace harmony. Allow every voice to be heard. Younger workers teaching older ones about technology can be complemented by having older staff share the knowledge that can only be gained by experience. Diploma-educated workers are more likely to lend an ear while remaining hungry for extra knowledge. How to avoid the generation clash Generational experts have made a fortune explaining to workplaces what a millennial is, and how they should fit into today’s workplace. Their intentions are honourable because that age group (born 1983-2000) currently make up the largest segment of the workforce. It’s estimated that this segment will grow to 75% within the next six years. Generational clashes on a work site are inevitable, but not unmanageable. Older workers tend to think promotion is a reward for loyalty and experience, whereas younger ones believe in reward based on expertise alone. Conflict can arise when older workers react poorly to a lack of formality or manners, while younger ones get insulted if their opinions are dismissed simply because of their age. In both cases, it’s usually a perception issue. Having an older worker mentor a younger one will build a bridge and create a sense of workplace stability that younger workers may never have experienced. Conversely, respecting and acknowledging a younger workers’ different approach and way of thinking can be a wonderful confidence-builder and reduce staff turnover. In these situations, a construction supervisor with a relevant diploma is more likely to be reflective and receptive to both sides of the argument, and able to negotiate a sound middle ground.   Keep the bigger picture in mind Two big construction industry trends are working off-site and sustainability. It’s easy to picture a future in which younger workers will drive trends while more experienced minds will help manage changes. In this case, harnessing the education of one group and the ‘on-the-job’ experience of another will complement skills in a successful way. Keeping that bigger picture in mind will help solve most, if not all, generational conflicts in the workplace. A harmonious culture has benefits for everything from project management to health and safety, and beyond. Managing to get workers of all generational differences on the same page is possible, and for work sites that manage to do so, it will be profitable as well. Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE  

5 Ways to Build a Strong Construction Brand

Starting a building and construction business is an exciting time. With the right tools and strategies, you can grow a successful building and construction brand and keep customers happy for years to come. While you may have the practical skills behind you, growing your business can be a completely different ball game to working for an employer. Developing a trusted brand takes time but its never too late to start.   Cement the basics Before launching your business, make sure to consider the relevant health and safety laws and everything else from your logo, branding and taxation requirements. A business plan is key to ensure everything is set up correctly and your business has a clear direction. It’s important to be aware of the procedures and laws that affect you. Get familiar with employment laws, health and safety regulations or local government policy, the last thing a growing business needs is an expensive legal mishap. If needed, contact a professional for advice. These aren’t the most exciting parts of your business, but they’re definitely among the most important. Just like in building and construction, a solid foundation is key!   Smart ways to invest in marketing There’s no point having a business if you don’t have clients. Marketing is one of the most effective ways to grow your business. Word of mouth marketing is incredibly useful, so make sure that all of your family and friends know about your new business. Once you build up a happy customer base, you’ll have a great source of word of mouth referrals. Take advantage of local council small business resources and keep an eye out for any free marketing or grant opportunities. Social media and online service directories are a savvy way to make sure potential customers can find you online. You may choose to invest in a professional website or search engine advertising. A smart way to build authority (and optimise your site for search engines) is to write ‘how-to’ articles for your website and social media. Joining authorities or industry groups such as HIA (Housing Industry Authority) means you can use their logo on your marketing and benefit from any support or resources that they provide.   Value quality over quantity When working for yourself, your income is directly linked to how much work you’re completing. It can be tempting to take on as much work as possible, in the hope that your business and profits will grow faster. However, this is not always the best strategy. Remember that quality work is always the top priority and the better your work, the more referrals you’ll get (and the better your reputation will be). A top-notch reputation can open doors for higher paying jobs or bigger contracts in the future. Constantly ask for reviews or testimonials from customers. These are great to use on your website and quotes as they build trust with potential clients. Getting the most from your staff If you’re working with employees, building staff morale is vital to support a growing business. The happier your staff are, the harder they will work and the longer they will stay with the business. Make sure to give employees adequate time off, be flexible with working arrangements and most of all, appreciate the hard work your staff put in for your business. It’s important to set clear guidelines so that staff know what you expect of them. These could include dress codes and vehicle maintenance standards or even rules surrounding the types of music you allow on site. These all contribute to your brand’s overall image. Branded uniforms and accessories will help maintain a professional appearance.   Improve your qualifications You may already have the skills or qualification to carry out your chosen trade, but if you’re starting a business, brushing up on other skills like business management, human resource management or business administration can be a smart way to learn important skills and cut down on costs by reducing the need to outsource. An RTO like the College for Adult Learning provides online courses so you can study part-time while you’re working. Starting and growing your building and construction business doesn’t have to be difficult and with the right qualifications and know-how, you can create a successful company brand that you’re proud to call your own. Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE  

What do Construction Managers Want in New Hires?

Construction Managers are always on the look-out for new hires eager to secure a job in construction. Construction is an exciting, ever-changing industry that helps build our great country. As an industry, it’s Australia’s third largest employer, and as a career, it opens the door to a wide range of opportunities. Total building projects (not including housing) have grown in excess of 8% a year, on the back of almost 12% growth in 2017/2018. Employment opportunities abound for the right candidates, with the right education, and of course the right attitude. So, what’s required to get a foot in the door in 2019? What are construction managers looking for in those who are new to the industry?   Get smart through study Qualifications are always well regarded in the construction industry. Obtaining a Diploma of Building and Construction will show a prospective employer a knowledgeable approach to the job. Construction firms are also embracing the rapid advances in technology such as drones, 3D printing, and robotics. Proof of your willingness to embrace change is highly regarded. A good work ethic is always crucial, and as the industry continues to grow, employers will be inclined to pay dedicated candidates a good wage. As labour sources stretch to the limit, many construction firms are targeting schools and universities for potential workers. The ageing workforce and a labour shortage are urging companies to pursue younger, educated and determined employees. Getting certified will go a long way in proving your willingness to be a hard worker.   Culture vultures: broaden your horizons Like any workplace, construction firms tend to develop their own culture, especially over a long period. Some will value life experience in equal measure to those who’ve spent their career on a worksite. Different life skills can be applied to specific roles, and employers will actively seek out those who’ve got a broad range of life experience. Demonstrating a broad range of life skills and experiences, as well as a desire to expand them will put prospective employees at a competitive advantage.   Get familiar with future construction trends What trends can be seen emerging in the years and decades ahead? In many instances, employers are changing the workplace to make it more female-friendly (although there’s still a long way to go, as 88% of construction industry employees are men). Sustainability is a buzzword that’s heard frequently on construction sites across the country too. Large amounts of waste created on sites need to go somewhere, so the focus is quickly shifting to recycling and reusing materials on other projects. Being educated in the field and having relevant knowledge will indicate a willingness to continue studying building industry trends and will be valued highly by innovative employers in the future. Wear out that shoe leather! No, we don’t literally want you to go and buy some work boots (although that’s not a bad idea). Make your voice heard and ensure that construction companies know you’re eager for on-the-job experience. Local builders may be happy to allow you to tour a job site, to give you a ‘feel’ for what it’s like to work onsite. Another way to get a foot in the door is to contact building industry-related unions and ask to meet with workers in a particular trade that interests you. Making these approaches with the backing of an industry qualification will set you apart. Education and knowledge are paramount and will go a long way in proving that you’re serious about building and construction.   Set yourself up for success The construction industry is a dynamic and versatile workplace that can offer employees a lifetime of career opportunities. The sense of self-satisfaction that comes from helping house people, or businesses, and being at the cutting edge of technology is very exciting. The work is varied, there’s no nine-to-five predictability, and you’ll always be an important cog in a much larger wheel. With so many benefits including job satisfaction and a good salary, construction is a stable and satisfying industry to work within. Now you’ve decided on where you’re heading, take the important first step and get yourself signed up to undertake a Diploma of Building and Construction Management(CPC50320). Put yourself at the front of the queue by being proactive, and you will be impressing a construction manager and securing a construction job as an impressive new hire. Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE  

Building and Construction Job Trends 2019

If you’re in the building and construction industry or planning to be, what job trends should you be watching out for in 2019?   Widening Opportunities in Australia The building and construction management industry is always changing and developing, with innovation and technology the main driving forces behind these changes. Australia is lucky to have a booming construction industry (it’s one of the largest non-service related industries in the country). In 2018, commercial construction alone grew by almost 10% thanks to strong population growth and new technologies. New construction projects consistently rise by 2% every quarter, creating more projects and jobs, making building and construction a smart choice for employment opportunities and career growth.   Impact of Pending Federal Election Infrastructure investment is always a highly contested political issue and with the upcoming Federal election in 2019, expect both parties to pledge budget funds to update our roads, building new hospitals and schools, and updating public transport systems. These large-scale projects provide jobs for those in all areas of the industry, from project management to architecture and traffic control.   More Women in Construction No longer is the construction industry as male-dominated as it once was. Women from all walks of life are enjoying the career opportunities that building and construction offer. In 2018, more women joined the industry, taking advantage of the high salaries and workplace flexibility on offer. In 2019, expect to see women in the construction workforce increase even further, continuing to make the industry inclusive for all involved.   Sustainability Still Important An important issue in all industries, sustainability in building and construction is one of the most important due to the high potential of waste created in the process. Expect to see an increase in recycling schemes, a focus on reusing as much as possible, and sustainable sourcing alternatives to common building materials. Sustainability in the planning stages will become common, with architects and developers working on projects that are kinder to the environment. We will see simple changes like using more greenery to bigger ones such as including natural heating and cooling to reduce electricity consumption.   Further improvements in Technology and Innovation On the increase in all industries, technology use in building and construction is set to soar in 2019. Types of technology to look out for include: Using Drones to plan projects more effectively Connected job sites by cloud technology which will allow all areas of a project to communicate more efficiently, breaking down location barriers Increased use of 3D printing Wearable technology that allows reporting and communication to be carried out on the go Robotics assisting with dangerous or repetitive tasks Read more about new technology trends in the building and construction space here.   Security in Employment and Salaries Even with the introduction of new technology, the construction industry is largely protected from technology endangering jobs. If anything, demand increases for workers with strong technical skills who can operate software and programs. Skill shortages in construction still exist, meaning salaries in the industry are highly competitive, in the hope of attracting workers to fill these gaps. The types of shortages vary by location, but research finds that carpenters, electricians, builders, labourers and project managers are some of the most in demand. The industry still offers high starting salaries, even for junior or graduate positions (an average of $60,000 per annum). Senior roles in positions such as project management attract salaries that regularly exceed $180,000 per annum. Download our FREE 'Your Career in Building and Construction Management' Guide Find the latest information in our eBook about a career in construction management, including current job opportunities, skills you need, salary information and more. DOWNLOAD MY FREE GUIDE   Increasing State Shortages across Australia NSW – widespread shortages in almost all areas including plumbing, cabinetmaking, glazing and tiling. Construction has increased 8.7% in the last year, and only 50% of all vacancies were filled. VIC – metropolitan shortage of bricklayers, state-wide shortages of all key construction areas including plumbing, building and painting. SA – statewide shortages in all areas of construction. Opportunities are present in bricklaying, cabinetmaking, plastering and glazing. Only 40% of vacancies are filled, as most applicants lack qualifications. NT – shortages or recruitment difficulty were reported in every trade. Qualifications are proving to be imperative, as 62% of applicants are considered underqualified by employers. QLD – metropolitan shortage of plumbers, and statewide shortage of glaziers, tilers, bricklayers and stonemasons. TAS – Shortages exist for plumbers, tilers, glaziers and bricklayers. Demand continues to rise due to strong building activity in Southern Tasmania. ACT – residential construction has created high demand for skilled workers. The most extreme shortages exist for stonemasons, roof-tilers and painters.   What can you take from these 2019 job trends? Opportunity! The building and construction industry is booming and will continue to flourish in 2019 and into the next decade. Now is the perfect time to upskill your qualifications and get your foot in the door of a rewarding and challenging career in building and construction. Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE  

Leading Technology Trends in Building and Construction Management

Careers in the building and construction management industry are rewarding, interesting and always changing. New technology trends have impacted the construction industry by offering innovative ways to assist building and construction managers to communicate better, work more effectively and achieve smarter results for clients. Read on to discover what the future holds for those working in building or construction management.   Drones Essentially drones are a flying camera which is controlled by a remote and have been used on the building scene for a few years now, most often for aerial photography and security. Drones have had a large impact on the way architects, project managers, construction managers and builders work on a site. Being able to see the job site from above gives all those involved a better idea of what work may be required to create the best building design for the area.   Apps A very broad type of technology, applications (apps) can be installed and used on mobile phones, tablets and computers. Available in a diverse range of categories, there’s an app for almost every need! In building and construction management, apps which may be useful include: Measurement Conversion Google Maps Dial before you Dig First Aid Reference Budget Trackers Portable Scanners   Artificial Intelligence Arguably one of the most important new trends in technology, Artificial Intelligence (AI) has many applications in the building and construction management industry. During the planning phase, AI can use knowledge from past builds to create plans or even survey a construction site, gathering information to create plans and blueprints while saving valuable money and labour. AI software can also be used to help manage contractors and staff by creating rosters and tracking hours. During the build, AI can offer ideas on how to best approach tasks using knowledge from previous projects. Another perk is increased safety on site, by powering driverless machinery ideal for tackling dangerous terrains such as holes or heights. The uses of Artificial intelligence are incredibly broad, with endless applications. As we learn more about what this technology can do, it’s use will only increase.   Connected Job Sites When working in building and construction management, you work with many people and on different projects every day. Connected job sites are becoming increasingly popular, assisting those involved to work faster and more effectively. With the use of software, multiple job sites or projects can be connected, allowing for better communication and understanding of the project overall and used to share measurements, instructions and plans between sites. This technology trend allows architects, project managers, engineers and anyone working on the site to be across all necessary information at any given time.   Wearable Tech Wearable technology like smartwatches and bracelets have come a long way since their invention. Not just for tracking fitness, wearable technology can be a big help on the job site, too. The user can set reminders and alarms as well as being easily contactable on the go. You can easily take your technology with you, without the worry of losing your phone onsite or carrying around a tablet or computer.   3D Printing An evolving technology, the use of 3D printing in the construction industry is starting to increase. One trending application is the ability to bring a plan, photo or drawing to life by building tangible models that impart a better sense of a project.   Robotics Robotics is a newer technology on the scene, and its use is becoming increasingly prevalent in the construction industry. Incredibly precise and accurate, robotics can be used in a variety of ways, the most effective being repetitive tasks, therefore freeing up people for more difficult cognitive tasks. The cost for this type of technology is currently high but will likely decrease as their use becomes more widespread.   Embrace new technology trends in your career Building and construction management is an exciting and rewarding industry which is ever-changing thanks to new technology trends. If you wish to take the next step in your building and construction management career, The College for Adult Learning offers self-paced, online courses like the Diploma of Building and Construction Management (CPC50320) to get you there faster. Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE  

How To Work Effectively With Architects

Construction and project managers must regularly liaise with many people involved in a build, including clients, contractors, builders, local government and architects. In this blog post, we’ll look at how you can work closely with the client’s architect (or team of architects) and liaise with them before, after and throughout the building process. Communicate throughout the construction project Communication is paramount when working with architects to develop an effective off-site and on-site relationship. For a successful project outcome, all parties must communicate quickly and openly with each other. The client, construction manager, architect and stakeholders must commit to open and result-orientated communication. Therefore, good project planning and project management are essential. Developing a clear plan and delegating tasks upfront means every stakeholder knows what needs to be done, giving the construction project the best chance of success. Manage architect and client expectations When working with an architect, there will usually be an initial meeting to set expectations about the project and discuss the client’s needs and wants. It is up to the client to decide the overall scope of the building project and desired result, based on their requirements. From here, the architect’s role is to design a build in line with these needs. As a construction manager, you will frequently work with the architect, client, builders and contractors to make plans come to life. To achieve a successful project, expectations must be realistic. Establish a time frame that is achievable by all parties and consider all the tasks and processes that need to be carried out. These should be communicated clearly to all involved. Using professional knowledge and experience, construction managers may advise the client or architect in areas such as: Permits required Feasibility of the build Time-frame expectations Types of contractors required Costings and budget information Download our FREE 'Your Career in Building and Construction Management' Guide Find the latest information in our eBook about a career in construction management, including current job opportunities, skills you need, salary information and more. DOWNLOAD MY FREE GUIDE   Manage issues throughout the build When working with any stakeholder on a large project, issues will inevitably arise. If challenges are handled correctly, they can strengthen the working relationship. However, if issues aren’t handled well and promptly, they can create more problems and lengthen the time frame needed to complete the build. When dealing with issues, it is important to do so professionally. Ensure that you: Raise any concerns as soon as possible Speak openly with all parties involved Arrive at a conclusion which is fair for everyone Always stay calm and respectful Seek mediation from a neutral third party, if required Managing the client-to-architect relationship The client-to-architect relationship is an important one as there needs to be trust established by both parties. Your client wants the best build possible and it’s your job to be the middleman who liaises between them and the architect. The client and architect will meet directly at the start of the project. However, it isn’t always possible for them to liaise frequently throughout the build due to time or location restraints. Therefore, as a caring and committed construction manager, you must effectively communicate between the client and architect to ensure that the needs of your client are being met and that the construction team supports the architect. Working with architects is one of the many important relationships you’ll experience during your exciting and rewarding career as a construction manager. With the right skills and effective communication, you will be highly regarded and respected in your field. Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE

The Difference Between a Builder and a Construction Manager

If you’re passionate about building and construction and looking to break into the industry, you’re probably wondering about the differences between builders and construction managers and which career is the best choice for you. Or perhaps you’re already a builder and contemplating a career move into construction management. Both career options are rewarding and challenging, but despite what many people think, they are different pathways. Differences between builders and construction managers Builders: Take on responsibility for delivering specific construction and labour tasks. They may also be involved in the excavation and demolition of a site. Manage their workload and often work within a small team. Are usually self-employed and with varied work. They can work on a residential home one week and a city skyscraper the next. Source all materials required for a job, always clean up the worksite and ensure the safety of themselves and their team. Carry out the majority of their work onsite. On smaller jobs, they may work alone. Often work with hazardous materials and operate machinery. Construction managers: Monitor and oversee numerous parts of the construction process, such as hiring staff and seeking permits. Work with many stakeholders, such as owners, developers, contractors, architects, project managers and local council. Require excellent communication skills and the ability to build rapport with people from a variety of backgrounds and industries. Are responsible for solving problems and being a direct point of contact for other people in their team. Manage other people’s workloads, including delegating tasks and supervising where necessary. Ensure that work health and safety standards are always adhered to and compliance in other areas is satisfactory. Maintain a high level of responsibility. Work across projects, with a mixture of both office and site work. Are usually employed by a company. What's your Management Trajectory? Are you wondering how far away you are from your next promotion? Take our quiz to assess your management career pathway. GO TO QUIZ Is a builder or construction manager career path right for you? Both jobs have positive aspects, but a career as a construction manager is incredibly rewarding, less taxing on the body, and has higher salary potential. Construction managers carry out minimal manual labour, meaning a decreased risk of short and long-term injuries. They have more responsibility and work with different people every day. Being employed as a construction manager rather than a sole tradesperson also means you’ll enjoy perks such as sick leave and annual leave, allowing you to achieve a healthy work-life balance. Construction managers also work onsite and are involved in the building process, however, they are expected to be across other areas of the project too. How to become a construction manager How can you move into a career as a construction manager? If you’re already a builder, tradesperson or working in the industry in some capacity, you’re heading in the right direction. You’ll have plenty of transferable skills that will set you up for success as a construction manager. If you’re working in other fields, the good news is that a variety of careers are excellent pathways into construction management. These jobs include finance, human resources, administration or customer service. The quickest way into your new career is by completing a relevant diploma qualification. Networking with industry connections and working on soft skills, such as leadership and communication, are highly important action steps you can take now. Learn to be a construction manager A Diploma of Building and Construction (Management) (CPC50320) is a highly respected course that will equip you with the practical skills needed to succeed in the industry. You can study flexibly online, alongside your current job and receive one-on-one support from your learning coaches. Construction management is a rewarding career Construction is a challenging and rewarding area to work in, and as the industry continues to boom, the potential for jobs has never been greater. If you’re looking for a change in direction from building or other relevant sectors, then a career in construction management is worth considering. Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE

The Differences Between a BCM and a BCB Qualification

What is a BCB qualification? A BCB qualification is a Diploma of Building & Construction (Building). This is often confused with a BCM or Diploma of Building & Construction (Management). Although the two qualifications are related to the same industry of building and construction, they are both very different qualifications. A BCB is a foundation-level diploma focusing on skills needed in building, whereas the BCM gives you the skills to fast track into the management side. A BCM is a better choice of the two if management is your long-term career goal. Overview of BCB or building and construction (building) You would complete the Diploma of Building and Construction (Building) as a foundational step to gain initial employment in the building industry. Career opportunities include roles in the following areas: Building construction and supervision Estimating Purchasing Contracts administration You would do a BCB to work in a junior role on a building site or head office environment. This qualification may also be relevant in a role such as a project management assistant. A BCB gives you the fundamental skills required to build low-rise, medium-rise or wide-span construction projects. Core units teach building codes and standards, construction contracts, estimation, tendering and work health and safety. Electives include site surveys, legal obligations, services layout and connection, and environmental practices. Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE Overview of BCM or building and construction (management) You would undertake a Diploma of Building and Construction (Management) (CPC50320) qualification if you were interested in advancing your career into a managerial and senior manager role. Occupational titles include: Project manager Construction manager Estimating manager Sales manager The skills you learn in a BCM are related to communication, teamwork, problem-solving, initiative, planning and organising, self-management, and using technology. Core units teach management skills such as budgets and financial plans, staff recruitment and induction, operations, work health and safety, and team effectiveness. A wide range of electives include customer service, databases and spreadsheets, people performance, project costing and quality, and asset management. Why study a BCM qualification? There are many situations where a BCM qualification may be a better choice than a BCB. The more common scenarios for studying BCM as a first diploma include: You’ve achieved an apprenticeship in carpentry or a related trade and have a few years of job experience You have advanced knowledge in building and construction You are transitioning from self-employment in a related field A BCM is the ideal second qualification in the following scenarios: You’ve already obtained a BCB or similar qualification but now seek a role with more managerial responsibility and better salary pathways You have a breadth of experience but have been injured or no longer want to do on-site, hands-on labour Your first accreditation is not bringing the job satisfaction or career advancement opportunities that you expected Download our FREE 'Your Career in Building and Construction Management' Guide Find the latest information in our eBook about a career in construction management, including current job opportunities, skills you need, salary information and more. DOWNLOAD MY FREE GUIDE Why choose a career in construction management? A construction management career is highly fulfilling and can offer continued pathways into very high-paying jobs such as senior project manager, quality auditor or general manager. A good building and construction manager enjoys being part of a team and helps to bring out the best in people, thrives in managing projects to fruition, has well-rounded communication skills, and understands the many aspects of building and construction. Choose a course that fits your vision Today’s modern-thinking construction manager is looking for job security and job satisfaction. You understand that a life spent on the tools until retirement is not viable and you have the dedication to make a change in your career. You are willing to engage and apply your mind and skills to the betterment of others and take immense pride in your work. CAL provides the Diploma of Building and Construction (Management) (CPC50320) to give you the skills necessary to further your career with a management position. We understand your vision and experience. We also provide competent and supportive learning coaches to keep you motivated, inspired and focused on your learning goals. Your journey to becoming a great building and construction manager begins from the moment you sign up.   Discover your career in construction management Explore courses designed to help you take your career to the next level in building and construction management! If you’re ready to take your career to the next level, a Diploma of Building and Construction (Management) (CPC50320) will make that happen. View Diploma of BCM

The Career Rewards of Becoming a Construction Supervisor

A logical place to begin a construction management career is with a job as a Construction Supervisor, a rewarding role with high levels of variety and earning potential. If you’re interested in building and construction and enjoy working with people, a construction supervisor career could be your perfect ‘what’s next’ choice. What is a construction supervisor? A Construction supervisor oversees and is responsible for all the activities at a construction job site. Construction sites vary in size and complexity, making jobs available for a wide range of experience levels. Working as a construction supervisor is a rewarding, dynamic and fast-paced position where no two days are ever the same. You could be managing a project budget, leading and motivating your team, dealing with stakeholders, enforcing OHS policies, problem-solving or collaborating on new ideas with the project management team – all in a day’s work. Why choose a career in construction supervision? A career as a construction supervisor is a smart and responsible choice because; Building and construction is an industry which is largely unaffected by the impact of new technologies and labour automation. Construction skills are ones that are always in demand and will always be needed, as long as we need buildings. Such career stability is great news as it ensures you and your family job security for the long term. Stepping up into a Construction Supervisor role means more responsibility and the chance to increase your income. Earning potential regularly exceeds $100,000 per annum. As a supervisor, your responsibilities will be varied, requiring you to work on a combination of both office tasks and on-site duties. Say goodbye to those long, unbroken days on the tools in the sun. If you enjoy working with people, then being a construction supervisor gives you the chance to be in a team environment every day. You’ll be relied on to lead and inspire your team, offering support and guidance where needed. You will also use your skills and qualifications to work with other teams involved in the build, such as project managers, architects and local council. Download our FREE 'Your Career in Building and Construction Management' Guide Find the latest information in our eBook about a career in construction management, including current job opportunities, skills you need, salary information and more. DOWNLOAD MY FREE GUIDE Who can get a construction supervisor job? The good news is you may already be on your way to a career in construction supervision. The role is perfectly suited to those already working in the industry such as builders, project managers and even junior engineers. Don’t worry if you’re currently working in another sector such as IT or Recreation. There are plenty of transferable skills which apply to this role, such as leadership and management skills, as well as experience working in administration, finance or human resources. How to get a construction supervisor career If you think a career as a construction supervisor could be for you, the College for Adult Learning can help you get started today. Our future-focused and nationally accredited Certificate IV in Building & Construction (Building) (CPC40120) is a self-paced online qualification with a focus on practical skills. You’ll complete core units that emphasise undertaking construction project work and applying project risk management techniques to further your understanding of project construction work.  You’ll also further your supervisor skills with units in site communication and administration processes for building projects. If you have highly relevant experience, you may be eligible for Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL), enabling you to get credit for the skills you already have and fast-track your certificate. Benefit from one-on-one support from your tutors as well as flexible payment options to suit all lifestyles and budgets. Continue to work while you study, or once you start. Many students find mentoring and employment opportunities open for them because of the confidence and credibility that studying gives them. Start your next career step with a nationally recognised qualification that gives you the lifelong skills to secure your ideal construction supervisor job. Study the Certificate IV in Building & Construction (Building) (CPC40120) at the College for Adult Learning online to grow your career. Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE

How you can work less while earning more in Construction Management

Working as a construction manager is a smart and rewarding career choice for anyone interested in the building or construction industry who wants to work less while earning more. If you’re currently a trades-person or exploring a career move into construction management, read on to find out how you can increase your earnings by working smarter, not harder. Start smart with the right qualification If you want to work less and earn more, a construction manager’s salary is the ideal choice. There are many ways to move into this line of work, and many different construction management roles, ranging from mid to senior level, depending on your experience and qualification.  Specialised qualifications in Contract Administration, Estimation, and Site Management are perfect for those ready to take their first step into a construction management position. Going into these roles usually entails 2-3 years of construction experience coupled with a certificate-level qualification.  The Diploma of Building & Construction (Management) (CPC50320) or the Diploma of Project Management (Specialising in Construction) (BSB50820) will equip you with the necessary skills to land a senior construction management role. You’ll sharpen your skills in managing labourers, stakeholders, and teams across a construction project.  In most cases, your qualifications will directly increase your earning capacity, and the more relevant qualifications you hold, the higher your salary can climb. Work-Life Balance Being employed as a construction supervisor gives you back control over regular and reliable working hours. Knowing your start and finish times every week will greatly assist in achieving a healthy work-life balance. You’ll appreciate knowing that there will be less early starts or late nights finishing a big job at the expense of family or friends. If you’re currently self-employed, you will already be aware that the responsibility of being your own boss is at the expense of a number of entitlements. Sick leave, annual leave and paid parental leave are benefits you can enjoy when employed as a construction manager. Say goodbye to missing a family holiday due to work – now you really can have the work-life balance you’ve watched others gain value from for years. Download our FREE 'Your Career in Building and Construction Management' Guide Find the latest information in our eBook about a career in construction management, including current job opportunities, skills you need, salary information and more. DOWNLOAD MY FREE GUIDE Maximise your earnings In the construction management field, if you are occasionally required to work above and beyond your regular hours, you are fairly compensated with overtime rates. All too often, this is a luxury that sole tradespeople don’t currently receive. Working overtime is usually optional and can give you the freedom to earn more, helping you to save faster for that house deposit, holiday or a new car. There’s no ‘I’ in Team Working in the construction industry connects you to part of a team culture at work every day, whether that be with tradespeople, project managers, site supervisors or other stakeholders. If you’ve experienced the monotony of working long stints going solo, chances are you’ll find being part of a team a rewarding, satisfying and better way to work. Happier, healthier you When working in construction management, you’ll be working less on-site. As a result, your chance of injury is minimised, and overall health is improved. With less manual labour and less time outside in possible harsh weather conditions, most people find working in construction management a welcome break after years on the tools. It’s not just physical injuries which are reduced, working as a construction manager can also benefit your mental health too. Many studies have proven that less stress and better work-life balance will significantly contribute to an improvement in overall well-being. When stress is reduced, the benefits include better sleep and wiser life choices. Climb the career ladder Should you wish to progress your career, construction is a thriving industry with plenty of pathways for you to achieve your career goals. Many start on the tools, building their experience and knowledge of the construction industry by working on-site.  You can turn that experience into a mid-level construction management position such as a; Site Supervisor Contract Administrator Building Estimator Project Coordinator  From there, becoming diploma-qualified can find opportunities in roles with more responsibility and higher salaries such as construction manager, project manager, or construction foreman. Use your existing transferable skills Whether you’re already working in the industry or looking to break in, the good news is there are plenty of transferable skills that will benefit you. Those working in finance, human resources or customer service may find themselves suited to most requirements for construction management. If you have prior experience in a relevant field, you may be eligible for Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) which will help to fast track your qualification, allowing you to complete fewer units. If you’re interested in increasing your income while working less as a construction manager, look for a flexible, self-paced online diploma course such as CAL’s Diploma of Building and Construction (Management) (CPC50320) that will give you the skills you need to excel in your new career path. You’ll graduate job-ready and confident about taking on a rewarding new role in construction management. Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE

What Jobs Offer The Best Salary in Construction

What are the best jobs in construction for salary growth and what sort of construction salary can you expect? Let’s dive into what careers have the highest salary in construction. What is the best career opportunity in construction? Project management, contract administration, site management and building estimating are the clear forerunners in construction jobs. Even with a slowing of the mining sector, opportunities continue to flourish for these positions within the construction sector. Project manager salaries The average salary for construction project managers is $136,496. This outperforms the average salary for engineering project managers which is $134,000. Construction estimator salaries Construction estimators can expect to earn $80,000.  Contract administrator salaries The average salary of a contract administrator varies greatly with a base salary of $120,000 but the potential to earn $288,000 or more. Site manager salaries Site managers make a base income of $77,000 per year, but this can easily reach $172,000 depending on expertise and company. Site managers also find themselves in many career paths leading to management, with roles such as foreman or leading hand along the way. Download our FREE 'Your Career in Building and Construction Management' Guide Find the latest information in our eBook about a career in construction management, including current job opportunities, skills you need, salary information and more. DOWNLOAD MY FREE GUIDE Where are the best job opportunities? Opportunities in construction careers are available across Australia in all states and territories that continue to show strong growth. By 2026, the forecasted number of construction jobs in Australia will reach approximately 1,388,500. Construction is a diverse and flexible career choice New data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics shows the following: Approximately 13.3% of construction workers are women. This means men outnumber women in the sector substantially. Around 1,322,100 workers are employed within the construction industry. 85.6% of construction workers were employed full-time. The average earnings from a role in the construction industry is $71,760 per annum (or $1,380 per week). Why you need to act on the construction opportunity now A career in construction makes strategic sense, with scope for great salaries, job satisfaction and job security. With so much growth and access to jobs within the construction sector, you don’t want to miss out on entering the sector now and securing a position that is a perfect fit for you. As the job market becomes more educated about the wealth of opportunities available in construction, more candidates will make a move from other sectors such as mining, building, engineering and IT. With such an abundance of growth and opportunity in the construction industry, it makes sense to secure that future with the right qualifications. Depending on your area of interest, one of the following qualifications may be the entry point you need into excellent construction roles and salaries: Certificate IV in Building Project Support (Estimator) (CPC40320) Certificate IV in Building Project Support (Contract Administrator) (CPC40320) Certificate IV in Building & Construction (Site Management) (CPC40120) Diploma of Project Management (specialising in Construction) (BSB50820) Diploma of Building & Construction Management (CPC50320 Your Career in Construction Management Do you want to learn more about construction management skills employers demand, emerging job roles and salaries, and recent industry insights?  Discover your career in construction management.  CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CAREER PAGE

Meet your Learning Coaches

Nasser Babaee
Head Coach: Construction and Project Management

Nasser is a Building and Construction professional and has a broad range of skills across the building and construction industry, including quality management, WHS management, efficient project scheduling and management, project profitability management and portfolio management.

In previous roles, Nasser has worked with numerous commercial and domestic building companies including Lendlease, Hansen Yuncken, Watpac and others. He has also worked with smaller building companies to improve their structures and systems, helping them manage their businesses and projects more effectively and efficiently.

Throughout his career in the industry, Nasser has helped companies implement structures and systems across quality management, planning and scheduling of works, recruitment and inductions, and liaison with industry bodies.

In his Vocational Training roles, Nasser has been helping students complete their qualifications and achieve their dreams of becoming project managers, contract administrators, site supervisors and more.

Meet the whole team

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I thoroughly enjoyed the course and would happily recommend to anyone who is in a leadership role.

Lee Hartwell

It covered all topics. Talent management, operations, leadership and metrics. Great overview issues in work place discussion. Great output.

Lenny Ewers

It was really great to be able to complete my Diploma at my own pace and I received excellent support from my CAL coach.

Kylie Jarvis

Very practical and useful information that is directly related to the workplace.

Angela Henderson

There are no other RTO's where you can do this and undertake work at your own pace in your own time. 

Shannon Watkins

Thank-you to the CAL team for providing me with a flexible learning environment that would fit around my working commitments.

Joshua Polkinghorne