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Project Management Courses FAQs

In short, project management is the management of change. Project managers are expected to take control and manage every little detail of the project – from the planning stage to the close.

What does a Project Manager do?

Typically a project manager will be nominated to lead a project and will be expected to be fully accountable for meeting its objectives. The project manager will be the leader of the project team and will be responsible for ensuring the following are completed in a timely way:

  • Gaining approval for the project aim and terms of reference
  • Selecting and leading the team and setting individual objectives
  • Ensuring a feasibility study is complete
  • Ensuring that the project is planned in appropriate detail
  • Allocating and monitoring the work and cost
  • Motivating the team
  • Managing a range of internal & external stakeholders
  • Reporting progress back to the organisation
  • Helping the team to solve project problems
  • Achieve, through the team, the goals Reviewing, documenting lessons learned and closing down

Is Project Management a good career?

The answer to this question really depends on you. Everybody has different ideas about what they consider to be a good career depending on their motivation. So, one way to approach this question is to discover what motivates you.

However, in regards to career prospects yes, it is a great career to be in with above average salaries and projected growth in PM jobs in Australia alone around 16.4% to 2017 and, with the demand for qualified project managers exploding throughout Asia, notably in China and India demand globally is expected to continue growing exponentially.

According to a survey conducted by PMI, the number 1 country for project practitioner salaries is Australia, with an average salary of $134,659 (PMI Project Management Salary Survey, Eighth Edition)

Furthermore, PMI forecasts that between 2010 and 2020, 15.7 million new project management roles will be created across the globe.

So, yes, based on these projections, we think it is a great time to be in project management!

I’m not working in projects but can Project Management skills help me in my job?

The skills required to be a project manager can be transferred to practically any kind of role. This is not all that surprising when you consider what attributes a good project manager needs after all project management is all about the core elements of management i.e. planning organising, directing, coordinating and controlling.

What personal qualities does a Project Manager require?

To be a successful project manager and make it your career you will need excellent organisational and communication skills, well developed problem-solving skills as well as the ability to keep focused on the ‘big picture’. You also need well developed leadership skills to provide direction and vision and finally, you will need to be able to motivate your team and engage your stakeholders.

What about Career Pathways- what should I start with?

If you are looking to gain a complete understanding of the project lifecycle and phases as well as the practical skills you need to be a successful project manager then you should complete a qualification.

In Australia currently, the Diploma of Project Management seems to have become the industry benchmark and many employers are seeking out candidates who hold this qualification because they know they will have the complete set of skills as well as the necessary underpinning knowledge to be a highly competent project manager.

Depending on the industry sector you work in and who you work for, you might also need to learn a specific methodology for managing projects. So you might gain the PRINCE2 or Agile Certification.

Once you have your primary qualification and any necessary methodology certifications and, after you have gained some considerable experience in project management you can further your studies and your employability by gaining some more advanced leadership skills and/or more in-depth knowledge and skills on specific aspects of the project (i.e. quality auditing etc.).

You can then move into program management and from there on to portfolio management and finally on to project Director or PMO Director. There are a range of certifications that you can achieve as you climb the PM career ladder.

What kind of people enrol in CAL training courses?

CAL trains over 1500 Project Management students annually. We get people who are working in many different types of companies, industries and roles, both from the public and private sectors.

In today’s economic climate, we sometimes also get students who are out of work and wanting to develop new skills for their resume and we also get others who are looking to progress their career from the baseline project manager into something more. We often get people who are either, working for an international company and are expecting to be posted offshore or, who want to apply for a Project Management job offshore.

There’s also usually a good mix of men and women, and we also get many students who have English as their second language. There’s almost certainly more than one nationality represented within a typical class. Usually we don’t get people who are younger than 22-24 because normally people who attend our training are experienced, mature professionals who have been in the workforce for some years.

Does CAL cater to people with English as a second language?

Yes. Both the Diploma and Certificate IV online programs are well designed for people from a wide variety of backgrounds and who may find it hard to follow spoken English.

The online program is narrated in a clear, easy to follow voice and at a pace that makes it easy for listeners to follow. The program is accompanied by PPT notes that summarise key points. The design of the online program makes it easy for participants to stop the video and go back to an earlier point and then return to where they were.

We get a lot of positive feedback from people with English as their second language as to how easy the course design made it to study the qualification.

The qualification programs are also fully supported by a coach who can be accessed via telephone, Skype or online as often as the participant requires additional support.

What additional support is provided to students in these courses

The College provides unlimited coaching support to students who are completing a qualification program.

Coaches can be accessed as often as required by telephone, Skype, email or in other online forums. They assist students to find their way around the program and help with technical difficulties as well as provide further information or perhaps help to explain a concept or idea a student may be struggling with. Coaches are on hand to discuss issues and help to solve problems and they also provide support and advice to students as required.

Our coaches are all expert project practitioners who have worked in project management for many years. They are also able to assist you to write a winning CV and to design a captivating cover letter that will ensure you get selected for interview.

The PRINCE2 & Agile programs also provide additional, out of hours access to trainers for participants as they prepare for their exam.

Why should I select a CAL course?

Our courses provide a complete solutions for project managers as well as career pathways.

CAL has more than 16 years experience in public, private and non-profit organisations in the delivery and consultancy support of project management and we training more than 1000 students in project management every year.

Our students come from all industry sectors and a broad range of jobs. Our courses focus on the practical application so important to do the job well as well as the underpinning knowledge required to be an exceptional project manager. Our processes, tools & techniques are sourced from many disciplines including project management, program management, other aspects of management and consulting and also cover a wide range of methodologies from PMBoK to PRINCE2 to Agile.

We also have a range of PD options for more experienced project managers that will give them the skills and knowledge to step up to program or portfolio management and then on to manage the PMO.

Our certification programs are delivered by the best in the field who are currently achieve 100% success rates in final examination and who will go out of their way to provide additional support and coaching in the lead up to the final exam.

All CAL programs are fully supported with dedicated learning coaches available to you on a one to one basis to help and support you in your studies. These coaches are available to you for your entire course of study and the access is unlimited.

Are the College For Adult Learning courses endorsed?

Yes. The College for Adult Learning is a Registered Training Provider (RTO) number 22228 licensed to deliver nationally accredited training and to bestow qualifications

What is the Diploma of Project Management and how does it relate to the PMI Certification?

The Diploma of Project Management is a qualification issued under the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) and it is recognised all over Australia. The Diploma Qualification is also highly respected and well understood globally. There are two main ways to achieve the Diploma:

  • The first is to complete a training course and this is appropriate for people with limited or no experience in project management or for those who’ve developed their skills entirely on the job and want to acquire the underpinning knowledge and best practice skills.
  •  The second way is to seek an assessment of the skills you already have. This recognition of current competency or RPL assessment is appropriate for people who have current, relevant experience as a project manager.

If you complete all the learning provided for you in the CAL Diploma of Project Management online program, you will have the knowledge you need to successfully complete the PMP (Project Management Professional) exam.

How is the Diploma of Project Management structured?

The Diploma was reviewed and updated by industry in 2013. As a result of this review a number of additional elective units have been incorporated into the qualification to enable participants to specialise in specific areas and or to gain more intensive knowledge in units best suited to their job or their future career.

The changes in this new qualification acknowledge the variety of methods and contexts for project management, and introduce a flexible approach to ensure application across the range of environments.

In particular, the units of competency are not aligned with any one particular approach, but can be broadly aligned with the approach taken by both the Australian Institute of Project Management (AIPM) and the Project Management Institute (The ‘PMBOK’ – PMI).

The Diploma comprises 12 units with 8 core units plus an additional 4 electives the candidate can self-select (following the guidelines).

The 8 core units are:
BSBPMG511 Manage project scope
BSBPMG512 Manage project time
BSBPMG513 Manage project quality
BSBPMG514 Manage project cost
BSBPMG515 Manage project human resources
BSBPMG516 Manage project information and communication
BSBPMG517 Manage project risk
BSBPMG521 Manage project integration

The College recommends selecting 3 electives from the following:
BSBPMG518 Manage project procurement
BSBPMG519 Manage project stakeholder engagement
BSBWOR501 Manage personal work priorities and professional development
BSBWOR502 Ensure team effectiveness

For further details on additional elective units please contact your learning coach.

Are our certifications and qualifications internationally recognised?

Yes. The Diploma qualification is recognised globally and candidates who satisfy the Diploma requirements are also eligible for GAPPS (Global Alliance for Project Performance Standards) Global Level 1 Certification.

The PRINCE2 & Agile Certifications are globally recognised.

Do I need to sit exams for Project Management qualifications?

No. The Diploma and Certificate IV are both competency-based programs of study so assessments are based on work-related activities and outputs.

How is the Certificate IV in Project Management Practice structured?

The Certificate IV was reviewed and updated by industry in 2013. As a result of this review a number of additional elective units have been incorporated into the qualification to enable participants to specialise in specific areas and or to gain more intensive knowledge in units best suited to their job or their future career.

The changes in this new qualification acknowledge the variety of methods and contexts for project management, and introduce a flexible approach to ensure application across the range of environments.

In particular, the units of competency are not aligned with any one particular approach, but can be broadly aligned with the approach taken by both the Australian Institute of Project Management (AIPM) and the Project Management Institute (The ‘PMBOK’ – PMI).

The Certificate IV course comprises 9 units with 3 core and 6 electives.

CORE
BSBPMG409 Apply project scope-management techniques
BSBPMG410 Apply project time-management techniques
BSBPMG411 Apply project quality-management techniques

ELECTIVES
BSBPMG412 Apply project cost-management techniques
BSBPMG413 Apply project human resources management approaches
BSBPMG414 Apply project information management and communications techniques
BSBPMG415 Apply project risk-management techniques

+ Select a further 1 from the list below

BSBPMG416 Apply project procurement procedures
BSBPMG418 Apply project stakeholder engagement techniques
BSBPMG417 Apply project life cycle management processes

Which Project Management qualification is right for me?

The Certificate IV in Project Management is designed for those who are a member of a Project Team who supports, assists or contributes to a project. It can also be useful to new project managers who manage small to medium sized, simple projects. It can also be used as an introduction to project management for people wanting to move into a career in the field.

The Diploma of Project Management is aimed at those who would be responsible for planning and managing large or complex projects through to completion. It is designed for people who have had some experience in project management and who are now ready to learn about how to manage the project it all its complexity.

I have been working with projects for many years. Is the Diploma my best option?

Yes. The Diploma level qualification requires that you have recently managed, or are currently managing, one or more complex projects in the workplace. If you have not been responsible for managing a project through to completion then the Certificate IV maybe more appropriate.

I already have Project Management experience and/or training. Will this be recognised?

If you have previously studied a project management qualification or have project management experience you may be eligible for a Credit Transfer and/or a Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL).  Where you have previously completed a unit from a PM or related qualification, you can apply to have this recognised as a credit transfer. For this to apply you must ensure that the unit code listed on your current statement of attainment or testamur matches exactly with those from the Diploma Qualification.

I already have a Certificate IV in Project Management. How do I upgrade to a Diploma?

The Certificate IV and Diploma of Project Management focus on different levels of project involvement however, the underpinning content remains the same. The Diploma focuses on the ‘management’ aspect of Project management and so, all aspects of project management must be assessed with a different set of criteria focused on the management.

To gain a Diploma of Project Management you will need to complete an additional 3 units as well as complete the Diploma level assessments for the Certificate IV units you have already completed. You do not need to complete further training for the units you have completed in the Certificate IV program.

What about University Qualifications – how useful are they?

Post graduate qualifications in project management and related disciplines are starting to become more common although the Diploma of Project Management remains the unofficial benchmark for employment as a project manager in Australia.

Depending on the university and the course of study you may achieve some advanced standing for the study you complete in the Diploma qualification for post graduate studies.

Generally speaking, post graduate studies are useful in very large and complex projects as well as Public Private Partnerships and other projects run by government. They are also useful to progress up the career ladder to an executive management or CEO position.

What is the assessment process for RPL (from start to finish)?

There are three steps overall:

  1. A briefing with your assessor either over the phone, Skype or in person to discuss the process and get you started
  2. Collection/development of evidence by the candidate (you are supported by your assessor throughout this process)
  3. Assessment of candidate evidence by an approved assessor & awarding of the qualification.

What Types of “Evidence” will be required to Support my Project Management RPL Assessment?

Each piece of evidence included should meet the following criteria:

  • Authenticity – is it clear this is your work, does it clearly indicate your involvement? For example, did you create and lead the development of the Scope document, or did you have involvement in specific area – indicate your contribution.
  •  Currency – typically documents should be from the last 3 years and include evidence which is up to date, i.e. from your current role.
  • Consistency – evidence is of a consistent quality and standard, i.e. at a Diploma level we would expect to see personal responsibility, autonomy, participation in teams.
  • Sufficiency – has sufficient evidence been provided, so overall have you provided evidence that displays to the assessor that you have depth in an area? This may be two pieces of evidence from different projects, maybe a strong piece of evidence from one project, many smaller pieces of evidence from more than two projects, or combination of evidence and work place examples.
  •  Validity – the evidence provided directly supports the Project Management criteria for your unit of assessment (if it doesn’t do not include).

All project management documents are useful in the assessment process including: Business Cases, Scope Statements, Charters, PID’s, Project Plans. Procurement Plans, HR Plans, Communication Plans, Quality Plans, Project Budgets, Schedules, Stakeholder Analysis, Risk Registers, Communications Registers, Communication artefacts such as e Mail’s and Presentations, Deliverable Sign off documents and Project Health Checks.
Remember this list is not exhaustive!

What are Credit Transfers?

If you have previously studied a project management or other related qualification you may be eligible for a Credit Transfer. This is quite simply a transfer of the unit you have previously completed to the qualification you are about to commence. Where you have previously completed a unit from a PM or related qualification, you can apply to have this recognised as a credit transfer. For this to apply you must ensure that the unit code listed on your current statement of attainment or testamur matches exactly with those from the Diploma Qualification.

A credit transfer can cut down the amount of training and/or RPL you need to do to complete a qualification.

What is the AIPM CPPM Certification and how does it relate to the Diploma PM

The Certified Practising Project Manager (CPPM) is a professional accreditation issued by the Australian Institute of Project Management. It recognises practical experience as a project manager. The only way to qualify for an AIPM CPPM Certification is to have appropriate practical experience as a project manager. Simply holding the Diploma of Project Management is not enough to meet the CPPM requirements, but, if you hold a Diploma and have experience, you would be likely to meet the requirements.

In fact, very similar competency standards for project management are used for the achievement of both the Diploma of Project Management (issued under the Australian Qualifications Framework) and the CPPM certification (issued by the Australian Institute of Project Management).

What is RegPM?

RegPM is the Australian Institute of Project Management industry Certification scheme. There are currently three levels of RegPM certification:
• CPPP: Certified Practising Project Practitioner (project team member)
• CPPM: Certified Practising Project Manager (project manager)
• CPPD: Certified Practising Project Director (project director / program manager)

What is the AIPM CPPP Certification and how does it relate to the Certificate IV in Project Management Practice?

The Certified Practising Project Practitioner (CPPP) is a professional accreditation issued by the Australian Institute of Project Management. It recognises practical experience as a project manager. The only way to qualify for an AIPM CPPP Certification is to have appropriate practical experience as a project manager. Simply holding the Certificate IV in Project Management Practice is not enough to meet the CPPP requirements, but, if you hold the Certificate and have experience, you would be likely to meet the requirements.
In fact, very similar competency standards for project management are used for the achievement of both the Certificate IV of Project Management Practice (issued under the Australian Qualifications Framework) and the CPPP certification (issued by the Australian Institute of Project Management).

Can I be assessed for an AIPM Certified Practising Project Manager at the same time as an RPL assessment for the Diploma?

A person with significant practical project experience may not necessarily hold a formal qualification such as a Diploma of Project Management. In many cases, it is not necessary or appropriate for such experienced PM’s to undertake training. The vocational framework allows a qualified assessor to determine whether an experienced candidate has met the performance and other assessment criteria for the Diploma as a result of work and life experience, prior training and so on. If the candidate meets all the requirements for the Diploma, then they may be awarded the Diploma without the need for any further training. This is called Recognition of Prior Learning or RPL for short.

By definition then, a candidate for the Diploma of PM by RPL is claiming that they meet the requirements of the qualification by virtue of their experience and prior learning etc. From this, it is logical to assume that most successful RPL candidates can also meet the AIPM experience requirements and so could also be successful in assessment for the RegPM.

Which is better for me – a Qualification in Project Management or the AIPM Certification?

The Certificate IV and Diploma of Project Management are both recognised vocational education qualifications from the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) and so both are recognised and endorsed by the Australian Government and in workplaces, universities and RTO’s throughout Australia.
A qualification in Project Management is proof that you have met the performance standards for Project Management and this places particular emphasis on building knowledge and skills. A qualification such as this provides you with the knowledge and skills you need to work in project management and it is a great foundation for a career in project management. Some employers place emphasis on their staff having formal qualifications in their field so, this is another good reason to have a qualification in project management.

A qualification is a formal way to have your skills and knowledge recognised and, it can set you apart from a person who does not have a qualification.

In addition, some universities will give credit for higher level AQF qualification is you want to complete an advanced qualification at university (i.e. a Master’s program in Project Management).

A qualification is also very good evidence for the subject matter knowledge component of an AIPM assessment.

An AIPM assessment is issued by the Australian Institute of Project Management in recognition of a person’s practical experiences as a project manager. It is acknowledgement that the candidate already has the necessary underpinning skills and knowledge and also brings the additional benefit of demonstrated practical experience as a project manager. This can demonstrate to employers that you have practical PM skills gained over an extended period of time.

Are there any text books or resources that I will need to study Project Management?

There is no requirement for a textbook for most of the PM courses offered here however, the College recommends a couple of useful texts for those people who like to have a reference at hand:
Hartley, Stephen 3rd Ed (2014) Project Management: Integrating Strategy, Operations and Change. Tilde Publishing, Prahran Vic.
You may also like to purchase a copy of the Project Management: Body of Knowledge (PMBOK©) text book.
If you are completing a PRINCE2 program, we recommend you purchase the Manual Managing Successful Projects with Prince2.
Agile Project Management has one main manual supporting the qualification scheme, published by The DSDM Consortium, called Agile Project Management Handbook. This can be purchased from APMG Business Books at: www.apmg-businessbooks.com

Where can I get a copy of the PRINCE2 manual?

The best and cheapest way to obtain any of the Cabinet Office publications is from the Book Depository. Delivery is fast.

Are Templates Available?

CAL Provides a comprehensive set of templates, calculations, examples, processes and other guides in both the Diploma and Certificate IV Qualification programs.

For PRINCE2 programs, templates can be found on the official PRINCE2 website.

We have also found other excellent sites for obtaining templates for project documents. Our favourite is the Tasmanian Government website.

What is PRINCE2?

Projects IN Controlled Environments, more commonly known as PRINCE2, is a process-based system for managing projects. It is a set of guidelines that you can apply to help you bring your project to a successful completion. It can be used for all kinds of projects – small, large, simple or complex.

There are now three levels of accreditation for PRINCE2 which result in internationally recognised qualification:
1. The Foundation Certificate shows familiarity with the PRINCE2 methodology. It is a qualification that may be useful to project office staff, people working in project teams or new project managers.

2. The Practitioner Certificate is based on a longer scenario-based exam and tests the ability to apply the PRINCE2 method to particular situations. It is intended for experienced project managers or those with significant experience of project environments.

3. The PRINCE2 Professional qualification is the next step for PRINCE2 Practitioners looking to further demonstrate their expertise in the PRINCE2 method. This level will test your ability to manage a non-complex PRINCE2 project across all aspects of the project lifecycle.
The rollout of the new accreditation is currently in progress and we will bring you the new professional qualification just as soon as it is available.

How does PRINCE2 compare with PMBOK?

Both PRINCE2 and the Project Management Institute’s Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge are based on best practice in project management. There are no contradictions in the two approaches but there are different emphases. Experienced project managers can effectively integrate both approaches. Some fundamental differences are listed below.

PRINCE2PMBOK
The approach to be taken by a project and its final deliverables are known at the start. If the approach is not clear, then there may be a preliminary project with a deliverable of a feasibility report.Projects may include a feasibility study.
The Product Based Planning Technique of PRINCE2 is used to define project outcomes as ‘products’. Activities are derived from the product flow. The focus is on the project’s deliverables.A Work Breakdown Structure is used. The focus on activities occurs at the start.
A Customer/Supplier environment is assumed with the focus on the customer’s Business Case. It is the customer’s Business Case which drives the project.No assumption is made on the organisation in which the project manager sits.
Projects are controlled by a small Board representing the interests of the Customer, Supplier and End-user of the project’s products. The Board is a decision making body chaired by an ‘Executive’ who is ultimately responsible for the delivery of the business benefit.Steering Committees tend to be larger and meet on a regular basis.
In the initial planning for the project, it is divided into ‘Stages’ based on management reviews or decision points. Approval to proceed is given on a stage-by-stage basis. During a stage, the project manager has full authority for the day-to-day management of the project. The Board requires only short reports provided the stage remains within agreed tolerances. A review of viability occurs at the end of each stage or if the tolerances are forecast to be exceeded. This is the concept of ‘management by exception’Projects are seen as following certain pre-defined phases aligned to the project life-cycle. The project manager is responsible for delivering the project and reports regularly at meetings of the Steering Committee.
Recent articles in the PMI journal have referred to an Adaptive Project Framework which in some part, incorporates the PRINCE2 idea of ‘Stages’.
Apart from the Product Based Planning technique, PRINCE is not prescriptive on the tools to be used or on areas such as leadership qualities, procurement processes etc. PRINCE2 takes the view that these aspects are well covered by proven methods or possibly affected by organisational standards or cultural differences.PMBOK includes several skills and specialist areas in the tool set of the project manager including Earned Value Analysis and Procurement principles

More information can be obtained from the articles provided on the download section of this page.

What is the difference between Foundation and Practitioner certification?

A PRINCE2 Foundation Certificate indicates an understanding of the fundamental concepts of PRINCE2. It is awarded after passing an examination of 1 hour consisting of 75 multiple choice questions.

The Practitioner Certification shows that, not only are the concepts understood, but that the person is able to apply them in different situations, to projects of different sizes and taking into account the special nature of the project. PRINCE2 Practitioners are expected to be able to scale PRINCE2 and tailor it to meet particular needs. The Practitioner Exam is a 2.5 hour Objective Test. It is misleading to call it a multiple choice paper, although answers are selected in a separate answer booklet. The questions are based on a scenario and require a solid knowledge of PRINCE2 as well as the ability to apply it to a particular situation.

Do I have to receive training to sit the exam for PRINCE2 or Agile Certification?

No, however this is recommended. In addition to receiving accredited training, individuals also have the option of self-study to prepare for the examination. Public exam sessions are usually available in capital cities of Australia to accommodate those who self-study. These are not currently offered by CAL. Currently only students who complete their training with us can sit for the exam.

This is because we are measured on the quality of our delivery and a key measure is the success and failure rate of all exam candidates. We can guarantee your success if you train with us but we have no control over the outcome if you are self-studied.

What is APMG-International’s Agile Project Management scheme?

The Agile Project Management scheme aims to address the needs of those working in a project-focused environment who want to be agile.
Based on the proven fundamentals within DSDM Atern, this certification provides the ability to deliver Agile Projects in organisations requiring standards, rigour and visibility around Project Management, while at the same time enabling the fast pace, change and empowerment provided by Agile.

What are the benefits of Agile Project Management?

Agile Project Management enables projects to have:
– Increased consistency in delivering viable solutions on time and on budget
– Improved likelihood of successfully meeting the users’ real business requirements
– Greater buy-in from users of the solution
– Greatly reduced risk of creating the wrong solution

Agile Project Management strongly complements PRINCE2® and other more formalised project management approaches.

Isn’t Agile Project Management designed solely for large software engineering projects?

No, Agile Project Management has been developed to meet the needs of all business change projects and programs.

Do I have to receive training to sit the exam for PRINCE2 or Agile Certification?

No, however this is recommended. In addition to receiving accredited training, individuals also have the option of self-study to prepare for the examination. Public exam sessions are usually available in capital cities of Australia to accommodate those who self-study. These are not currently offered by CAL. Currently only students who complete their training with us can sit for the exam.

This is because we are measured on the quality of our delivery and a key measure is the success and failure rate of all exam candidates. We can guarantee your success if you train with us but we have no control over the outcome if you are self-studied.

Are there any pre-requisites for the Agile Project Management examinations?

There are no pre-requisites for the Foundation examination. Candidates must achieve a pass at Foundation level before completing the practitioner examination. The DSDM Atern Foundation and Advanced Practitioner certificates are also acceptable pre-requisites for the practitioner exam.

What are the main publications for Agile Project Management and where can I purchase them?

Agile Project Management has one main manual supporting the qualification scheme, published by The DSDM Consortium, called Agile Project Management Handbook. This can be purchased from APMG Business Books at: www.apmg-businessbooks.com

If you are enrolled in an Agile course, you will receive a copy of this handbook as part of the course fee.

How long will it take to learn the Agile Project Management material?

For individuals self-studying it is almost impossible to say. As all candidates have different experience and amount of time available for study, it varies from person to person. We suggest you buy the handbook and have a look through for yourself before deciding how long you need to spend learning.

For those studying with an accredited training organization, foundation courses are generally delivered over 3 days, while combined foundation and practitioner courses are generally delivered over 5 days. It is well worth investigating with individual providers, as many will offer tailored and blended learning solutions.

What is the relationship, if any, with the DSDM Atern scheme?

Agile Project Management is based on DSDM Atern, which has always been the only Agile method to fully-address the concept of an Agile project, and provides detailed guidance on how to manage and deliver Agile projects.

Agile Project Management focuses on the elements of Atern that are specific to the Agile Project Manager; it is important to note that Atern also provides detailed guidance on delivery techniques and solution development, which are outside of the Agile Project Management Handbook.

Although Agile Project Management can be viewed as a subset of DSDM Atern, there are some extra features in Agile Project Management that are not currently available in Atern. These include “Top Tips” for Agile Project Managers at the conclusion of most chapters. These “Top Tips” have been collected from the in-depth practical experience of professional individuals who have managed and delivered Agile projects for many years. These are practitioners who work across a wide range of backgrounds, from small, simple projects to large, complex projects, including regulated environments where they need to work in conjunction with other methods and approaches such as PRINCE2, ITIL, CMMI, ISO, etc. Access to this experience through these “Top Tips” has proved to be invaluable and will help the Agile Project Manager to avoid pitfalls and prepare for success.

Do I have to receive training to sit the exam for PRINCE2 or Agile Certification?

No, however this is recommended. In addition to receiving accredited training, individuals also have the option of self-study to prepare for the examination. Public exam sessions are usually available in capital cities of Australia to accommodate those who self-study. These are not currently offered by CAL. Currently only students who complete their training with us can sit for the exam.

This is because we are measured on the quality of our delivery and a key measure is the success and failure rate of all exam candidates. We can guarantee your success if you train with us but we have no control over the outcome if you are self-studied.

Where can I get more information about Agile Project Management?

The official DSDM website contains further information and you will also find information on Agile Project Management and other Best Practice products at the official APMG website.

How often do the PM Qualifications and other Certifications need to be updated?

Technically speaking, you do not need to update a qualification. Once you have it well, it lasts forever and you can continue to cite it as such on your CV.
However, the reality is that all vocational qualifications are updated in line with industry requirements, changes in legislation and regulations and the changing nature of the job. So this means that, sometime in the future the qualification you’ve gained will be reviewed and updated and, the pressure will be on to gain the ‘new’ or most recent qualification. This can be done by upgrading and, if you remain in project management it is a very simple process assessing your current competency.
The good news is that the qualifications in project management were updated in 2015 so a qualification gained from 2015 should remain current for between 5-8 years or so (depending on how much and how quickly this profession changes).
PRINCE2 Certification must be renewed after a set period of time (currently 5 years).
The Agile Certifications have no currency issues or updating requirements (at the time of writing).

What is the PMBOK Guide?

The PMBOK Guide (Project Management Body of Knowledge) has documented what is considered to be a minimum body of knowledge that a project manager needs in order to be effective. It breaks down to nine areas of knowledge and they are:

1. Project Integration Management
2. Project Scope Management
3. Project Time Management
4. Project Cost Management
5. Project Quality Management
6. Project Human Resource Management
7. Project Communications Management
8. Project Risk Management
9. Project Procurement Management
The guide is highly recommended as a resource for all project managers.

Why do a MS Project Course?

MS Project is a really useful tool that can help you to manage your project and it is most often used in small to medium businesses.

If you are just starting out as a project manager then MS Project is a very useful tool to know how to use.

Most larger companies and organisations who manage a large number of projects will probably use a proprietary product to help them to manage projects effectively and, where this is the case, MS Project is not applicable. Instead you would need to complete the organisation’s proprietary training program.

What Additional Support do I get with the MS Project Course?

You receive 12 months additional telephone coaching with this course to ensure that you can use this software like a pro!

 

Disclaimer: All information is provided in this FAQ is for guidance purposes. It should be noted that legal, government & industry body etc. requirements are subject to regular change, therefore the College for Adult Learning cannot be held liable for incorrect/out-of-date information. We recommend that users of this website also obtain information from elsewhere including current information/requirements from relevant organisations (government, private & non-profit) as appropriate.